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How to Sell Art: The Abundant Artist Podcast

from Cory Huff, TheAbundantArtist.com, How to Sell Art Online
52 Avg Episode Length: 39 min
Most recent episode: Dec 01, 2022 09:00 AM
Last Checked: Within the last few hours
Language: en Explicit: false Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: We interview successful professional artists including painters, sculptors, photographers and other fine artists. We talk about the business of art and what it takes to succeed.

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How to Sell Art: The Abundant Artist Podcast


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Welcome back to The Abundant Artist, the show that dispels the myth of “the starving artist” and shares how you can live an abundant life as an artist and make a living from your talent one interview at a time.

 

Joining the podcast today is Dan Cleary, a professional portrait and fine art photographer living in Dayton, Ohio. As the owner, operator and photographer of Cleary Creative Photography studio, Dan has served the Dayton region for more than 30 years. He works with various clientele from individuals, families, and small companies to fortune 500 corporations. Additionally, Dan has written and published the book, Wright Brothers: Then and Now, a compelling visual tribute to the pioneers of flight.

 

In this episode, Dan shares about his journey in discovering his passion for photography, how he came to open his own photo studio and build a client base, and the process of creating his newly published book.

 

Key Takeaways:

[:30] How Dan Cleary got started in photography.

[7:54] Dan’s photography journey post-grad school; How he came to learn his strengths in photography and open up his own photo studio, Cleary Creative Photography.

[10:44] About a recent large client of Dan’s.

[13:05] Where Dan grew up and his strong connection with Dayton, Ohio.

[17:55] About Dan’s photography series and book, Wright Brothers: Then and Now, and how he seamlessly blended historical images with the modern-day images he shot.

[25:22] How did Dan orchestrate such a large project both logistically and financially?

[29:13] How Dan managed his travel logistics and international flights for this project.

[33:36] Dan shares his experiences with marketing and getting his Wright Brothers book on the shelves.

[41:33] Why relationships are crucial in any business – especially art – for return customers.

[43:20] Cory thanks Dan for joining the podcast!

 

Mentioned in This Episode:Cleary Creative Photography

Cleary Fine Art Photography

Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Decisive Moment

Wright Brothers: Then and Now, by Dan Cleary

 

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Welcome back to The Abundant Artist, the show that dispels the myth of “the starving artist” and shares how you can live an abundant life as an artist and make a living from your talent one interview at a time.

 

This week on The Abundant Artist podcast, Cory is thrilled to be joined by a return guest – Patricia Vargas! The last time Patricia was on the podcast was about 5 years ago – and suffice to say, a lot has changed since then! If you don’t already know Patricia, she is the owner of the renowned Parima Studio. Currently residing in Chino, CA, with her husband and tabby cat, Arya, Patricia is a visual artist who combines her passions of painting, designing, and technology to create large-scale, custom, abstract art using her computer as her canvas.

 

In this episode, Patricia shares what has changed for her since she was last on the podcast, how her art career has evolved, what her experience was like during the pandemic (and how she has adapted to these changes), and what she does day-to-day to balance her business practices while minimizing distractions. Patricia also offers some advice to other artists who may be interested in getting started in the digital art space and what they can do to market themselves online!

 

Key Takeaways:

[:30] Cory welcomes Patricia Vargas back to the podcast!

[:56] What Patricia has been up to for the last five years since she was last on the podcast and how her art career has evolved.

[3:00] What Patricia loves about creating digital paintings.

[3:45] How Patricia’s “nerdiness” shows up in her professional career as a digital painter.

[5:35] How Patricia is selling her digital paintings as prints online.

[7:05] Patricia explains what a general licensing deal looks like for her.

[8:09] Films that Patricia’s work has appeared in.

[8:49] How does Patricia license her work to a hotel? What does that process look like?

[10:40] How did Patricia build up relationships with art consultants?

[12:07] Patricia shares how she got started in being featured in a variety of magazines.

[13:25] Would Patricia agree that blogging in 2010 is what social media is today?

[14:09] How blogging helped Patricia get featured in magazines, in turn, helping her be noticed by art consultants.

[15:32] Does Patricia still do acrylic painting outside of her career with digital painting?

[16:25] Patricia’s favorite tools and technology for digital painting!

[17:37] The difference between the iPad Pro and the XP Pen Tablet.

[18:34] Does Patricia have any favorite Procreate toolsets?

[19:34] What Patricia likes about the XP Pen Tablet.

[20:11] What is the desktop device that Patricia connects her tablet to?

[21:30] How Patricia pivoted and adapted during the pandemic as a digital artist that sells their prints online.

[25:23] How Patricia balances her day-to-day business practices and minimizes distractions.

[27:53] Why has Patricia cut down on which social media platforms she focuses on?

[28:59] How Patricia leverages Pinterest and Tailwind to get leads.

[31:47] How Patricia tracks profitability with her ads.

[32:55] What books is Patricia reading right now?

[36:26] Patricia shares about a new exciting road opening up for her and her business.

[39:49] Cory thanks Patricia for joining the podcast once again!

 

Mentioned in This Episode:The Abundant Artist Podcast: “Managing a Successful Print Studio with Patricia Vargas

Patricias Etsy Shop: Parima Creative Studio

Patricias Instagram: Parima Studio

Patricias Website

Procreate

Apple Pencil

iPad Pro

XP Pen Tablet

Adobe Photoshop

Corel Painter

Creative Market

Epson Printers

Pinterest

Tailwind

The Dutch House, by Ann Patchett

 

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Welcome back to The Abundant Artist, the show that dispels the myth of “the starving artist” and shares how you can live an abundant life as an artist and make a living from your talent one interview at a time.

 

Joining the podcast today is Creative Director and Set Designer, Marina Skye! Skye does freelance set design and creative projects for restaurants, recording artists, designers, and clothing stores – just to name a few. Her creative designs have caught the attention of the fine art world; platinum recording artist, Jidenna; the infamous Stankonia studios; 2Chainz’ Street Execs, Mike Will’s Studio; and many more!

 

In this episode, Skye shares her journey as a creative professional and set designer, how she began building out her portfolio when she was first starting out, the exciting doors she has opened from always being open to new challenges and opportunities, the business side of how a set design project works from top to bottom, and what’s to come for the future of her business as she moves onwards and upwards!

 

Key Takeaways:

[:30] How Skye developed their aesthetic as an artist.

[2:02] About Skye’s background and their pathway as an artist.

[3:15] What Skye studied in college.

[3:29] Skye’s first job out of college and what led them to transition out of it and create their clothing line.

[6:18] How Skye began to develop a portfolio for their set design through decorating parties.

[8:06] Why Skye was OK with working for free while building her portfolio.

[11:28] How Skye’s free work transitioned into paid work.

[16:05] Skye shares about the sorts of opportunities that became available to her after her 6-month nightclub set design project.

[17:47] About Skye’s 3-month set design project, the Trap Music Museum.

[20:55] Skye breaks down the business side of how a set design project works.

[21:45] How the process of working on set design looks like from top to bottom.

[23:30] How Skye builds her mood boards and mockups for her clients.

[25:21] Who pays Skye when it comes to set designs for artists – the label or the artist themselves?

[25:55] The challenges of building set designs to be taken apart and put back up on the daily for touring artists.

[27:55] What Skye is excited about right now as an artist.

[29:50] How did COVID impact Skye’s business?

[32:35] Where to find Skye’s work online!

[33:17] Skye’s plans for the future on how to possibly expand her business.

[35:07] How Skye delegates in her business without being directly hands-on with all of her set designs.

[36:05] Cory thanks Skye for joining the podcast!

 

Mentioned in This Episode:Set by Skye

Set by Skye on Instagram

Trap Music Museum

Candytopia

 

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Welcome back to The Abundant Artist, the show that dispels the myth of “the starving artist” and shares how you can live an abundant life as an artist and make a living from your talent one interview at a time.

 

Joining the podcast today is one-of-a-kind artist, Genesis Be. Genesis is a critically acclaimed poet, peace activist, and artist from Biloxi, Mississippi; with her work being featured in The Associated Press, New York Times, NY Daily News, Soledad O’Brien, and VICE. Often using theatrical protest during her live performances, Genesis brings attention to both the global and localized issues surrounding racial justice, the peace movement, queer visibility, and gender equity. Her goal with her art is to bring human dignity to the forefront of our divided world; to advocate for compassion, vulnerability, and the burning need for freedom.

 

In this conversation, Genesis highlights and calls attention to the importance of artistic expression from the soul; the connection between activism and art; her personal story of growth, expression, and exploration as an artist; and why it is that she does art. Genesis also shares insights on the importance of trying new things and getting messy, finding the balance in making money while staying true to yourself and discovering solace in solitude.

 

Key Takeaways:

[:30] Genesis Be shares about her love for the people of Mississippi and why she sees it as part of her mission to spread the message of love about the people in her state.

[2:40] Genesis highlights examples of what makes the Mississippi especially resilient and inspirational.

[4:47] How Genesis would describe her art.

[6:16] How Genesis’s artistic expression differs in the various mediums she expresses herself in (such as art, music, poetry, theatre, etc).

[11:52] Genesis describes what an NFT is and why she began to engage with the blockchain as an artist.

[14:34] The importance of trying new things as an artist and not being afraid of getting messy.

[15:00] Genesis shares about her favorite videogame.

[16:58] About the powerful and important activism work Genesis has been doing throughout her life.

[22:09] Why Genesis paints stick figures that interact with barriers; her artistic mission statement.

[27:49] Genesis’s insights into why our youths’ mental health is eroding and the main drivers at play.

[32:21] Genesis’s experience with finding solace in loneliness and solitude.

[36:00] How writing played a key part in Genesis’s journey early on.

[37:50] The difference between art on social media vs. in person.

[41:24] How Genesis makes a living and supports herself financially as an artist.

[43:29] Genesis’s advice to other artists on making money.

 

Mentioned in This Episode:Genesis Be

Mississippi Rising Coalition

VyZen

We Are Mississippi | Theo Sutton Interview

Genesis’s activism work featured:

The Associated Press

New York Times

NY Daily News

Soledad OBrien

VICE

 

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Welcome back to The Abundant Artist, the show that dispels the myth of “the starving artist” and shares how you can live an abundant life as an artist and make a living from your talent one interview at a time.

 

Returning to the podcast today is Flora Bowley! Flora is a painter, pioneer, permission-giver, and author of four books: The Art of Aliveness, Brave Intuitive Painting, Creative Revolution, and Fresh Paint. She believes that creativity has the power to awaken, empower, heal, and transform; and that you have everything you need right now to reignite your creative fire.

 

Blending over twenty-five years of professional painting experience with her background as a yoga instructor, healer, and lifelong truth seeker, Flora shares her advice for creating art intuitively, letting go, and rediscovering your love of art (without getting caught up in the technicalities and perfectionism). She speaks about what we can do to get unstuck, how she guides artists through artistic exploration in her retreats, her wisdom around staying connected to your creativity, and more.

 

If you’ve been feeling the pressure around creating art and are struggling to let loose, have fun, and reconnect with why you began creating art – this episode is for you! As a retreat leader and guide for other artists, Flora has incredible insight into what it takes to reignite your love for creating and connecting to your artistic expression.

 

Key Takeaways:

[:30] Cory welcomes Flora back to the podcast!

[:52] Flora shares what she has been up to since her last appearance on the podcast.

[2:55] About Flora’s new retreat center.

[5:05] What kind of retreats has Flora historically led? How have the retreats that she runs now shifted? Why does she love doing retreats?

[12:40] Flora shares what she believes the purpose of art is, and how she guides artists in creating raw, beautiful art from their souls.

[14:37] Bringing the art of creativity to non-artists. Flora’s advice on reconnecting to the love of simply creating without getting caught up in the technicalities and technique.

[19:37] What inspired Flora to buy her own retreat center? What inspires her to do this work?

[26:22] The silver lining of the pandemic with regards to creating, change, and community.

[28:27] About the two books that Flora published during the pandemic.

[30:26] Flora shares what it was like to transition from writing about painting to writing about ideas for her newest book.

[34:23] About Flora’s painting book that she released during COVID, Fresh Paint.

[37:03] The artist paradigm.

[41:01] Cory’s book recommendations.

[42:04] What art may come out of the great resignation? Why are artists and non-artists craving simplicity?

[45:19] What mindfulness looks like to Flora and how she engages in it.

[47:50] How does Flora exercise/move outside of creating?

[50:18] Where to learn more about Flora.

 

Mentioned in This Episode:Flora Bowleys Website

Flora Bowleys Books

Brave, Intuitive Painting Careers with Flora Bowley” – Episode 5

What Its Like to Sell 100,000 Paintings with Jose Trujillo” – Episode 43

Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less, by Greg McKeown

Effortless: Make it Easier to Do What Matters Most, by Greg McKeown

 

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“I realized that stopping before I was done, especially with the process-oriented thesis where I'm not completely in control. I'm like in peripheral control of what's. Not all mine. That leaves room for the viewer to come into it when everything's locked down and every detail is nailed down. I find that work can often be less engaging. If it's got a little space where you can enter into its imperfections maybe, or it's question marks. That seems to go along well with the idea of being process-driven.” – Blair Vaughn-Gruler

In this episode of The Abundant Artist Podcast, we are joined by Blair Vaughn-Gruler, Blair makes paintings that are driven by procedure and process. Accumulation, repetition, erasure, and the physical motions made in the process of mark-making harken back to her many years practicing martial arts and foreground the body’s relationship to painting.

A Michigan native and New Mexico transplant, Vaughn-Gruler has been obsessed with painting since childhood. Her spare, non-objective compositions are exercises in organizing space. Even when shapes or lines repeat themselves to excess, a calm arises out of the chaos.

As the conceptual love child of Cy Twombly and Agnes Martin, Blair (born in 1955) makes paintings to reconcile her early modernist training with the lived experience of the information age.

She holds a BFA in painting from Northern Michigan University and an MFA in Visual Art from Vermont College of Fine Art. She and her husband Ernst Gruler were owners of GVG contemporary located in Santa Fe, New Mexico which has represented evolving abstract and non-objective Arts, fun, figurative, and functional sculpture and are carefully curated for the past 10 years.

Join us as Blair, discusses her process-driven works, sharing her thoughts on how art makes her evoke emotions, dealing better ways with gallery owners, and tips for taking yourself seriously as an artist. Let’s tune in to her story!

[00:00 - 12:13] A Conversation Between the Media and The Artist: A Process-Driven Work

  • Painting helps you organize your brain chemistry.
  • How it becomes a process-driven work and a conversation between an artist and its medium.
  • Blair describes how her work responds to her and vice versa.
    • She responds emotionally and intellectually
    • The media responds through her process as shown by mark-making.
  • Blair answers how she decides to finish or abandon a piece that is processed.
    • She exhausts all resources. And makes sure to leave a room for the viewer to come into
    • She believes when every detail is nailed down, it would be less engaging than those of that who has

A little imperfections and question marks around it.

  • Artist observes that this accessibility comes from the physical sensation of the work, which helps evoke emotion.
  • She shares her breakthrough moment when they were in graduate school and how felt engaged with her paintings
    • “I actually felt like I took them in through my body instead of my intellect” – Blair Vaugh-Gruler

[12:14 - 24:10] How to Work Better with Gallery Owners

  • Working with galleries can be difficult.
  • Blair shares tips for avoiding rejection in the Art World.
    • Research to find out if the gallery is interested in artists and if they have a submission process
    • Be ready with a good body of work and be willing to put in the effort to build a relationship with the Gallery.
  • The Many Costs of Running a Gallery and can be difficult to make a profit.

[24:11 - 31:40] Expenses of Being an Artist

  • Living in Santa Fe, New Mexico, Blair points that there are many expenses associated with being a successful artist in the city.
    • Payroll,
    • advertising
    • networking fees.
    • Shipments and insurance
  • It’s important to established a good gallery relationship if you want to be successful.
  • A good gallery will have salespeople and administrative staff as well as researchers to help you choose the right art pieces for your gallery.

[31:41 - 35:31] " Discovering the Art Genealogy of Your Favorite Artists”

  • Genealogy is a passion of Blair
  • Blair’s journey into abstract expressionism was influenced by artists like Jackson Pollock
  • For the author, following the lineage of an artist is important to gaining confidence in one's own work
  • Blair recommends reading books or watching films about the artists mentioned in the show.

[35:32 - 38:22] Closing Segment

 

Key Quotes:

 

“You can put water media on there and it's going to suck the pigment into the clay, but you can't control it. So that's what makes it a conversation like I do this, it does that. I go, oh. That's not what I meant. Okay. Now I have to do this and now it does that. And that's where the conversation comes from. That is the fun part for me” – Blair Vaughn-Gruler

 

“You have to do some research. you have to figure out where you might want to be.” - Blair Vaughn-Gruler

 

“I think it's easy to get too focused on the commodity factor, The commodity, getting the physical object and, getting that sold to sort of throwing the baby out with the bath water, because what everybody's looking for in the making and the collecting. Are sort of the connection and the intangible glimpse into the mystery of creativity” – Blair Vaughn-Gruler

Resources mentioned:

Agnes Martin

https://www.moma.org/artists/3787

Jackson Pollock

https://www.moma.org/artists/4675

See Blair Vaughn-Gruler works at gvgcontemporary.com

The Abundant Artist exists to dispel this notion and teach artists like you about all of the other ways that you can make a living from your art.

Connect with us:

Website: https://theabundantartist.com

IG: https://www.instagram.com/theabundantartist/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theabundantartist/

LEAVE A REVIEW + help someone who wants to know more about the Art Industry and selling their art. Your ratings and reviews help get the podcast in front of new listeners.

 


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Visual artist and entrepreneur Najee Dorsey is known for embracing southern roots in his work by relaying scenes of African American life in the south on canvas. He began his journey as an artist at the age of five, selling his artwork to his mother for candy. From that point on, Dorsey continued making art as a favorite pastime.  In his work, as Najee chronicles moments in Black life throughout history, he maintains that “stories untold are stories forgotten”

 

Far from the days after dropping out of art college, and becoming uncertain about his future in the arts, Najee has forged a successful career as an artist, being featured in numerous solo and group museum shows, television broadcasts, and print publications. As well as these accomplishments, he has skillfully combined his creative edge, and business acumen to develop a steadily growing online community that documents, preserves and promotes the contributions of the African American arts community. 

 

Let’s tune in to his story!

 

[00:01 - 07:07] Opening Segment

 

  • The Poor People’s Campaign
    • A children-centered campaign that brings conversation on environmental racism and injustice
    • The connection of the Poor People’s Campaign with the Civil Rights Campaign

 

[07:08 - 17:55] Black Art in America

 

  • BAIA: A community and resource in one
  • How BAIA has grown and created its own culture and impact in the art community and society
  • There’s a space for everybody in black art
  • Creating legacies, leaving an impact to the world 

 

[17:56 - 29:34]  Building Art Communities and Leaving an Impact

 

  • Tangible level community building
    • Najee’s vision for BAIA’s headquarters
  • Building Communities for Black Artists
    • Utilizing space and bringing more culture in America
  • Participative theaters and galleries 
  • Coming Soon for BAIA: School Arts Education 
  • Walking around the neighborhood and engaging with people on the ground

 

[29:35 - 38:00] The Creative Economy

 

  • Najee remembers creative spaces during his childhood
  • The Art in Najee’s Home
  • Why commerce kills creativity
  • Widen your lens and look at people from another perspective

 

[38:01 - 45:01] Closing Segment

 

  • Najee shares how to support artists of color
  • Challenges in the organizational side 

 

Connect with Najee through Instagram.  Visit Black Art in America or you can also go to his personal website and be a part of our mission of documenting, preserving, and promoting the contributions of the African American arts community.

Thanks for tuning in!  

 

WANT TO LEARN MORE?

 

Connect with The Abundant Artist through Facebook and Instagram.  Want to know more?  Check out this link.

 

If you liked our show, please LEAVE A 5-STAR REVIEW, like, and subscribe!  

People Mentioned

 

 

Tweetable Quotes

 

“As an artist, there are times where we have to lend our creative energy to something that could be so much more impactful or bring attention to an area that needs so much attention.” - Najee Dorsey

 

“People want to create and they want to be supported. And so part of that has to do with what the artist may naturally be interested in.” - Najee Dorsey

 

“If we could find more ways to be more giving, more loving, and more supportive, it doesn't take big things all the time to do that.  That's how we build, that's how we grow. That's how we share and can love on each other and build a community that we all can be proud of want to be a part of.” - Najee Dorsey

 


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Welcome back to The Abundant Artist, the show that dispels the myth of “the starving artist” and shares how you can live an abundant life as an artist and make a living from your talent one interview at a time.

 

Multidisciplinary artist Zeph Farmby joins the podcast today to share his journey as an artist from tagging on the streets to selling his shirts in major stores, being noticed and commissioned by A-list clients, creating original pieces for broadcasts worldwide, and showcasing his work in exhibitions. Combining his graffiti skills with his formal art education, Zeph’s unique art style stands out in the crowd.

 

In this episode, Zeph shares about the major influences in his life and art, how he stays true to art, his experiences with getting a formal art education, his entire art journey, and his advice to young artists on how to build a sustainable art business that allows you to make a living.

 

Key Takeaways:

[:30] How Zeph and Cory first met.

[1:46] Would Zeph describe himself as a “collage artist”?

[2:37] How Zeph first got started as a graffiti artist.

[6:03] Zeph explains some of the culture and terms of graffiti.

[13:05] Major influences on Zeph’s style and how his art journey led to where he is today.

[17:45] Zeph’s journey from not being able to sell a T-shirt at the local flea market to having his shirts solid in one of the hottest stores in Chicago.

[27:43] How wanting a hat influenced Zeph and his art in a major way.

[31:49] Zeph shares about his journey and development of marrying his two styles together.

[40:13] Zeph shares more about his art journey after moving out of Chicago and one of the pivotal pieces he created that helped him not only stand out in the crowd but get noticed by big-time music producer, Swizz Beatz.

[49:48] Zeph shares his experiences and experimentations with art exhibitions and installations in Chicago and New York from 2016 onward.

[54:30] Zeph’s business breakdown and his main sources of income as an artist.

[56:16] Zeph’s advice to young artists on how to build a sustainable art business that allows you to make a living.

[58:08] How does Zeph manage to balance murals, originals, commissions, merchandise, etc? Is it difficult or enjoyable to switch between these different aspects of business?

[1:00:09] Cory thanks Zeph for joining the podcast.

 

Mentioned in This Episode:Zeph Farmby

Clubhouse

Mr. Brainwash

 

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Welcome back to The Abundant Artist, the show that dispels the myth of ‘the starving artist’ and shares how you can live an abundant life as an artist and make a living from your talent one interview at a time.

This week, Cesar Biojo joins the podcast! Cesar is a Barcelona-based Colombian oil painter and co-founder of Kaleido, an online network that supports artists, collectors, and art galleries alike.

In their conversation together, Cesar shares about his process of creating his unique existential artwork, why existentialism fuels his work, and his invaluable advice on growing as an artist, becoming a better communicator, delving deeper into your work, and discovering your purpose. He also shares about Kaleido, its mission, and its fascinating augmented reality feature that allows users to virtually explore an artist’s gallery.

 

Key Takeaways:

[:30] Why Cesar often quotes Sartre alongside his work.

[6:04] How did Cesar find/create his purpose?

[10:55] How Cesar creates his work and how the concept of existentialism influences his process.

[14:44] How art and therapy collide.

[17:19] Cesar’s advice to young artists around the intersection of therapy, making a career of art, and inspiration.

[19:28] Cesar’s tips for growing and exploring as an artist.

[21:40] Why being able to explore existentialism, emotion, and philosophy can make you a better communicator but not necessarily a better artist.

[22:48] Cesar’s insights on whether or not you need a formal education to “make it” as an artist.

[24:22] What Kaleido is, what its mission is, and why Cesar is a part of it.

[28:47] About the augmented reality feature that is unique to Kaleido

[30:00] Cesar’s involvement in Kaleido and how Kaleido protects artists.

[33:06] Cesar’s predictions on NFTs.

[35:44] Cesar discusses the progression and future of augmented reality.

[39:55] Where they are planning on heading with Kaleido regarding augmented reality.

[42:50] Where and how to learn more about Kaleido.

[47:25] Cory thanks Cesar for joining the podcast!

 

Mentioned in This Episode:Cesar Biojo

Instagram @CesarBiojo

How Cindy Sherman Redefined Self-Portraiture

Kaleido

Ready Player One (2018, Film)

Minority Report (2002, Film)

Neuromancer, by William Gibson

 

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Welcome back to The Abundant Artist, the show that dispels the myth of “the starving artist” and shares how you can live an abundant life as an artist and make a living from your talent one interview at a time.

 

This week, Cory welcomes Jose Trujillo to the podcast! Jose is an impressionist painter that is one-of-a-kind in that he has been selling his art on eBay for over 10 years and has sold over 100,000 original art pieces online. Considered a modern Monet, Jose’s art has been described as “dream-like,” fast-paced, musical, and a “fantasy of colors.”

 

Jose shares both the highlights and the lowlights with his experiences of selling his artwork on eBay, how he keeps up with selling only original paintings online, his personal approach to painting, his journey and discovery with impressionist painting, and his unique philosophy on “finding the gems in the volume.”

 

Key Takeaways:

[:30] Cory welcomes Jose Trujillo to the podcast!

[:47] Cory reads a quote about Jose on his website.

[1:28] Jose shares his experiences with selling his art on eBay for the last 10 years.

[5:22] Why does Jose consider himself “not known” in the art world even though he’s sold over 100,000 art pieces in the last 10‒12 years?

[7:10] Jose shares about his 4,000 square foot art studio space and his team behind the scenes.

[9:56] Why and how Jose only sells original artwork, and the system he created to keep up with his eBay sales.

[12:25] Where does Jose’s work ethic come from?

[14:41] Why Jose and his wife opened a clothing shop.

[16:14] When and why did Jose begin to sell his art on Craigslist?

[20:21] Jose shares his thoughts on Cory’s theory on whether or not impressionist artists are more willing to approach different ways of selling.

[23:22] How and why Jose learned how to paint and why impressionism, in particular, interested him.

[31:22] When did Jose begin to paint? How did he initially start practicing?

[33:38] Jose’s philosophy on “finding the gems in the volume” regarding art.

[35:22] What Jose’s schedule looks like now vs. earlier on in his career.

[36:16] Jose explains the quote on his website, “To see without the interruption of thought.”

[40:30] How Jose feels about his current work/life schedule.

[42:00] About Jose’s regular gratitude practice and how it helps him with his art.

[45:30] Cory thanks Jose for joining the podcast.

 

Mentioned in This Episode:Jose Trujillo Art

Jose Trujillo on eBay

Jose Trujillos Youtube

Video of how Jose created his messaging on Craigslist

Ugly Delicious (Netflix Series)

 

Find More Episodes Over on TheAbundantArtist.com

 

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New

TRU Talks About Theater

from Theater Resources Unlimited | Electracast
8 Avg Episode Length: 64 min
Most recent episode: Nov 25, 2022 08:00 AM
Last Checked: Dec 02, 2022 07:06 PM
Language: en Explicit: no Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: TRU, or Theater Resources Unlimited, was formed to promote a spirit of cooperation and support within the general theatre community by providing information and a variety of entertainment-related services and resources that strengthen the capacity of producing organizations, individuals producers, self-producing artists and other theater professionals.

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09-16-2022 "Really interesting conversation!"
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TRU Talks About Theater


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In the room: Tim Jerome, president of Main Street Musicals which promotes development opportunities for original stage musicals throughout regional America; and John Sparks, founding director of NMI (NewMusicalsInc) which is working with Shanghai Grand Theatre and Beijing Damai Culture of Alibaba to nurture writers and their writing in an ambitious plan to create stageable new works of musical theatre in China. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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In the room: Joe Barros, artistic director of NY Theatre Barn which is focused on the development of culture shifting musicals during incubation; Aaron Salley, president and managing director of Musical Theatre Factory, an inclusive community wholly dedicated to the developmental process of innovative new musicals by early-career artists. Learn about the development process used in each of these organizations, how to become a part of it and what they look for when they consider bringing in and/or showcasing new shows.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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In the room: Aimee Todoroff, managing director of the League of Independent Theater, and Carla Hoke-Miller, Director of Theatre Programs and Partnerships for the Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment. What is New York doing to support the return of theater? Is it working? Is it enough? What else should we ask for, and what are the most effective channels to go through to initiate necessary changes? We'll look at city agencies and initiative, plus take a broader look at ways in which theater artists – and all artists – can be proactive throughout the country Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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In the room: Anne Morgan, program director for NNPN and Stephen Kaplan, playwright. Learn about the many programs and services NNPN provides for the theater industry, including the Rolling World Premiere initiative and the New Play Exchange®, a cloud-based script database, enhanced with a robust search-and-filter mechanism, crowd-sourced recommendations of plays, and personal script and coverage information storage. Plus the connectivity of a social networking site. These services have helped the development of new work: writers have a credible site for posting their work, and producers and theater companies can look for works of interest. Anne and Stephen also talk about Stephen's upcoming Rolling World Premiere and how that came about as well as the role of NPX in connecting writers and producers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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In the room: Adam Hyndman, board member and Tara Moses, advisory board member of Broadway for Racial Justice, fighting for greater equity and inclusion by providing immediate resources, assistance, and amplification for BIPOC in the Broadway and theatrical community at-large. Though its nickname referred to the bright lights on its marquees, intentional or not, white privilege and perspective have shaped Broadway and our business from its very beginnings. On June 8, 2020, the pandemic already raging, the BIPOC proclamation "We See You, White American Theater" challenged theater to acknowledge the problem and address it. The current commercial season boasts 7 plays by BIPOC writers, and regional theaters have announced their most diverse seasons to date. Is it enough? And is our current COVID world stifling progress? Bob and his guests wade into the deep waters of controversy and face both the challenge and the necessity of facing the roadblocks in the way of having a true equity and inclusion in our business and our world

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In the room: Jim Kierstead (Tony winner for Hadestown, Kinky Boots and Pippin; plus Ain't Too Proud, The Inheritance, Waitress) talks about moving his energies into the virtual world with Broadway Virtual, a new company specializing in streamed and video content, as well as educational opportunities to help artists master the new technologies. He'll also share his journey balancing the two sides of his ambitions: playwrighting and producing. Plus his plans for coming back to live performance. With a side trip into the current controversies within our slow-to-change business.

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In the Room: Kathryn Jones, leader and Innovator in live-streaming, virtual fundraising and social-first content, founder of Collective Agency. Two years in shutdown has pushed us to expand our creative skill set. Kathryn and Bob look at the virtual tools that can still serve us going forward, and how they can contribute to our future success in theater, from livestreaming as a supplementary revenue stream to online fundraising to new ways to approach marketing and increase awareness of our product

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In the room: entrepreneur, producer, writer and groundbreaking theater manager and owner Eric Krebs talks of a dedicated life in New York theater. Co-founder of the George Street Playhouse, and manager for years of the John Houseman and Douglas Fairbanks Theatres, Eric has been a part of the evolution of off-Broadway, through the creation of Theatre Row to running several of his own theater spaces including the current Theatre 555 on West 42nd Street. He shares his experiences with candor and offers insights into the challenges of maintaining off-Broadway as a viable environment for developing theater artists and art.

Poetics of Place

from ElectraCast Media LLC
4 Avg Episode Length: 15 min
Most recent episode: Nov 21, 2022 10:00 AM
Last Checked: Within the last hour
Language: en Explicit: no Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: Host Alastair Gordon explores the healing impact of good design in an increasingly complex and troubled world. He conducts spirited, in-depth interviews with some of the leading figures in the world of design, art, architecture and environmental awareness. Alastair is an award-winning critic, curator and author who has written for many publications including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Vanity Fair and Architectural Digest. Gordons eye for the convergence of art, architecture and commerce is unerring.  - Publisher’s Weekly. An ElectraCast podcast.

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Freakonomics Radio
Each week, Freakonomics Radio tells you things you always thought you knew (but didn’t) and things you never thought you wanted to know (but do).
#Documentary #Society & Culture
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Poetics of Place


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Host Alastair Gordon talks to artists Eric Fischl and April Gornik about the activist roles they’re playing in their hometown of Sag Harbor, New York. Together with architect Lee Skolnick, they transformed an old Methodist church into a ground-breaking arts center, one that not only serves the community but honors the historic legacy of Sag Harbor. Host: Alastair Gordon Guest: ERIC FISCHL and April Gornik With Lee Snoknick (architect) The Poetics of Place podcast series is produced by ElectraCast Media (Mark Netter, Peter Rafelson and David Tausik) & Gordon de Vries Studio (Alastair Gordon and Barbara de Vries). An ElectraCast Production. THE CHURCH, SAG HARBOR https://www.thechurchsagharbor.org/ ERIC FISCHL http://www.ericfischl.com/   APRIL GORNIK https://www.aprilgornik.com/   LEE SKOLNICK https://www.skolnick.com/the-church ALASTAIR JAMES GORDON https://alastairgordonwalltowall.com/ GORDON DE VRIES STUDIO https://www.gordondevriesstudio.com/    SAG HARBOR CINEMA https://sagharborcinema.org/ ELECTRACAST MEDIA https://electracast.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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Alastair Gordon talks to legendary fashion designer Calvin Klein about creating a Hamptons beach house for himself. Calvin describes the long and painstaking process of collaboration he went through to create his own minimalist sanctuary on a sweeping ocean-front property in Southampton, NY. In the process, he treated every surface and material with the same intense attention to detail he used in his collections. As Calvin says in the podcast, “If I hadn’t been a fashion designer, I would have become an architect.” Host: Alastair Gordon Guest: Calvin Klein With Edwina Von Gal (landscape designer), Fred Stelle (architect), and Michael Lomont (architect). The Poetics of Place podcast series is produced by ElectraCast Media & Gordon de Vries Studio (Peter Rafelson, Mark Netter, Alastair Gordon, Barbara de Vries) with cultural co-sponsor Guild Hall, East Hampton, NY. An ElectraCast podcast. Visit Guild Hall. Visit Poetics of Place at ElectraCast. Visit Gordon de Vries Studio. Learn more about ElectraCast Media. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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Alastair talks to architect Teddy Cruz and political scientist Fonna Forman about an innovative live-work cooperative they designed for homeless refugees in Tijuana, Mexico. An ElectraCast podcast. Visit Poetics of Place at ElectraCast. Visit Gordon de Vries Studio Learn more about ElectraCast Media. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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Host Alastair Gordon explores the healing impact of good design in an increasingly complex and troubled world. He conducts spirited, in-depth interviews with some of the leading figures in the world of design, art, architecture and environmental awareness. Alastair is an award-winning critic, curator and author who has written for many publications including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Vanity Fair and Architectural Digest. "Gordon's eye for the convergence of art, architecture and commerce is unerring."  - Publisher’s Weekly. An ElectraCast podcast. Visit Poetics of Place at ElectraCast. Visit Gordon de Vries Studio Learn more about ElectraCast Media. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

PORTRAITS

from National Portrait Gallery
50
Most recent episode: Nov 01, 2022 07:05 AM
Last Checked: Dec 02, 2022 08:16 PM
Language: en Explicit: false Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: Art, biography, history and identity collide in this podcast from the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery. Join Director Kim Sajet as she chats with artists, historians, and thought leaders about the big and small ways that portraits shape our world.

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PORTRAITS


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When Gloria Steinem co-founded Ms. magazine, she wanted a cover image that would break completely with the norms of the day. There would be no high-end models and no teasers for makeup tips. Instead, the preview issue featured a goddess with eight arms. And she was blue.

Kim speaks with Gloria and also with the magazine’s first editor, Suzanne Braun Levine, about the ways women had been visually portrayed until their groundbreaking publication hit the newsstands, and how the staff at Ms. worked to turn those stereotypes on their head.

See the portraits we discuss:

Pauline Perlmutter Steinem

Gloria Steinem and Dorothy Pitman Hughes, 1971

Marilyn Monroe

Student Protest

Susan B. Anthony

Ms. magazine preview cover

Gloria Steinem and Dorothy Pitman Hughes, 2013


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Dr. Dorothy Andersen solved a vexing medical mystery by identifying cystic fibrosis. But the mystery of her missing portrait remained unsolved.

This week, we're featuring an episode from the Lost Women of Science podcast about a physician who changed the way we understand acute lung and gastrointestinal problems in small children. But if she was such a medical heavyweight, why did her 1963 portrait disappear from Columbia University's Babies Hospital? The answer tells us something about the perils of memorialization.


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Washington Post editorial cartoonist Ann Telnaes says her profession serves as a canary in the coalmine for freedom of expression, a kind of oxygen monitor for democracy itself. When cartoonists are ducking for cover, she says, you'd better watch out. She also shares with Kim why she made the jump from Disney animator to thick-skinned political commentator, through drawing. Then Wendy Wick Reaves, who procured stacks and stacks of political cartoons for the National Portrait Gallery, explains why President Nixon with a Pinocchio nose is indeed a form of portraiture.

Find Ann’s work on Twitter, @AnnTelnaes.

See other images we discuss:

Polly Got A Cracker, by Charles Nelan

Anti-Cartoon Bill Defiance

The Watergate Bug, by Patrick Oliphant

The Credibility Gulf Stream, by Draper Hill

The Gulf Stream, by Winslow Homer


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Indra Nooyi grew up in a conservative Brahmin household in India, but that didn’t stop her from playing cricket with her brother’s friends, or from joining an all-girl rock band. Years later, when she ascended to the top job at PepsiCo, she would push the boundaries again as one of the few women running a Fortune 500 company.

Nooyi talks to Kim about why she initially shrank from the press when she arrived in the C-suite, and how she wanted to be seen in her own portrait as an American Portrait Gala honoree.

See the portraits we discuss:

Indra Nooyi

Meg Whitman

Anne Catherine Hoof Green

Martha Stewart


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From our fellow Smithsonian podcast, Sidedoor, the story of Edmonia Lewis— the first sculptor of African American and Native American (Mississauga) descent to achieve international fame. Her 3,000-pound masterwork, “The Death of Cleopatra,” commemorated another powerful woman who broke with convention… and then it disappeared.

See Edmonia Lewis’s portrait here.


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Before cable news and email and Twitter, it was the postal service that transmitted ideas and information across land, sea, and political divides. Kim speaks with National Postal Museum chief curator Dan Piazza about some of the messages that stamps themselves were communicating, including a few asides from Philatelist-in-Chief, Franklin D. Roosevelt.

We also pair some noteworthy stamps to original artwork that lives right here at the National Portrait Gallery.

See the portraits we discuss:

Benjamin Franklin by Duplessis

Franklin’s stamp

Roosevelt and the Little White House

Roosevelt at his desk

Susan B. Anthony, bronze bust

Susan B. Anthony, three cents

Susan B. Anthony, photograph

Susan B. Anthony, fifty cents

Jean Baptiste Pointe du Sable

Benjamin Banneker


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José Andrés is the Michelin-starred chef known for jumping into action to feed people affected by hurricanes, wildfires, and most recently the war in Ukraine. But he’s also a huge admirer of a woman whose photograph lives at the National Portrait Gallery– the Civil War nurse Clara Barton. Museum director Kim Sajet talks with Andrés about his call for ‘longer tables,’ and also takes us down the block to Barton’s old digs to see how their stories overlap.

See Clara Barton’s portrait here.


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The House committee investigation into the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol has generated a lot of interest in one of the National Portrait Gallery’s latest commissions -- an official portrait of former President Donald Trump. So we decided to revisit an episode that takes a spin through the ‘America’s Presidents’ exhibition.

Director Kim Sajet digs into the thorny question of what a presidential portrait is meant to convey, especially if the president in question has been impeached. Should it carry the glow of prestige, or the markers of personal failings? Is this gallery hallowed ground, or a place to question power? "If you're in the business of showing these paintings," says Washington Post art critic Philip Kennicott, "you want to send people out a little hungry."

Also featuring former deputy director Carolyn Carr.

See the portraits we discuss here:

President James Buchanan

President Richard Nixon

President George H. W. Bush

President Bill Clinton

President George W. Bush

President Barack Obama


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Atlantic editor Vann R. Newkirk II talks to Kim about the mutability of memory, as seen through two portraits of the abolitionist John Brown. He also explains how a photograph of his mom helped him to appreciate the fragility of democracy in the United States, and why he tries to keep a garden wherever he goes.

See the portraits we discuss:

George Washington Carver

John Brown daguerreotype

John Brown painting

Marylin Thurman Newkirk


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Photography and the Civil War crashed into one another, making it affordable for soldiers to have their picture taken before going off to war. What Black soldiers communicated in these images was a desire not just for freedom, but for citizenship. But they didn't always control how their photographs were used.

Drs. Deborah Willis and Rhea Combs talk with Kim about the photographs taken of - and for - Civil War Soldiers. Because it turns out there’s a big difference.

See the portraits we discuss:

Harper’s Weekly special edition

Gordon after his escape

Peter with scarred back

Tintype of soldier

Soldier with painted backdrop

1
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kristo.art

from Curtis Cates
11 Avg Episode Length: 25 min
Most recent episode: Feb 07, 2020 01:27 PM
Last Checked: Dec 02, 2022 08:11 PM
Language: en Explicit: yes Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: welcome to kristos art appreciation camp! free your inner art critic and learn how to become the art expert you already are...!

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kristo.art


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A painting isn't a work of art until YOU get to spend some time with it. But what if you don't like it? Is it still Art?  Transcripts, links and sound credits (mostly from the fabulous and generous contributors to freesound.org) all on the website https://kristo.art/podcast/14-michael-krebber-simple-is-difficult

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in this episode I talk about my own work — and the serious concept of Kairos. see the website https://kristo.art/podcast/13-richard-hunt-sweet-home-chicago (https://kristo.art/podcast/13-richard-hunt-sweet-home-chicago) for my images, as well as full transcripts, links and credits... Useful Links: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Hunt_(sculptor) (Richard_Hunt) https://www.chicagoparkdistrict.com/parks-facilities/jonquil-park/ (Jonquil Park) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/16-inch_softball (16-inch_softball) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midnight_in_Paris (Midnight in Paris) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kairos (Kairos) https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Sturm%20und%20Drang (Sturm und Drang) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Peter_Altgeld (John Peter Altgeld) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gutzon_Borglum#/media/File:Altgeld.JPG (Gutzon Borglum) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terra_Museum (Terra Museum) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hecate (Hecate) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synchronicity (synchronicity) http://lensgarden.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Arrow.jpg (Arrow camera) http://lensgarden.com/light/the-real-diana-camera-a-plastic-wonder/ (Diana camera) http://www.saic.edu/profiles/faculty/Robert-Clarke-Davis (Robert Clarke-Davis) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinhole_camera (pinhole camera) https://www.artsy.net/artist/henri-cartier-bresson (Henri Cartier-Bresson)      

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transcripts, links and and a few extra surprises are all available at https://kristo.art/podcast/10-antoni-tapies-part-2-love-letters (https://kristo.art/podcast/10-antoni-tapies-part-2-love-letters)

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You'll find transcripts, links and credits for this episode... as well as few extra surprises on the website at https://kristo.art/podcast/9-antoni-tapies-part-1 (https://kristo.art/podcast/9-antoni-tapies-part-1)  

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In this episode, we hear from quite a few Cologne celebrities — even if they're no longer, um, hanging around... Also, a major synchronicity pops up — making for a pretty cool surprise... And if you're not sure what a synchronicity is — I've got a pretty good definition you can easily grok, without having to read Carl Jung's 100 page treatise on it... you'll find a full transcript of the episode along with links, credits and a few surprises at kristo.art: https://kristo.art/podcast/8-a-study-in-burnt-orange-part-3 (right here) awesome sound credits: sound of diving board and splash courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/patchen/sounds/6726/ (patchen)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution License). "Please dont do that" courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/girlhurl/sounds/339161/ (girlhurl )This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (Creative Commons 0 License). "NO!" courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/theuncertainman/sounds/402021/ (theuncertainman )This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution License). sound of a dry-cough courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/danieldouch/sounds/466555/ (danieldouch )This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution License). crunchy, munchy chewing courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/Bon_Vivant_Pictures/sounds/456376/ (Bon_Vivant_Pictures )This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (Creative Commons 0 License). "mmmm" courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/TheAtomicBrain/sounds/161004/ (TheAtomicBrain )This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (Creative Commons 0 License). "ja, ja, it’s okay" courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/Roses1401/sounds/482476/ (Roses1401 )This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution License). Angry-Muttering courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/RoivasUGO/sounds/233578/ (RoivasUGO )This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution License). "uh-oh" courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/DWOBoyle/sounds/144258/ (DWOBoyle )This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution License). "whatever..." courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/p%C3%B6rnill/sounds/421688/ (pörnill )This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (Creative Commons 0 License). ("naughty-naughty" / horror ambience mix)"naughty-naughty" courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/balloonhead/sounds/367153/ (balloonhead) - This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution License). horror-ambience courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/klankbeeld/sounds/135836/ (klankbeeld) - This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution License). "who’s that?" courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/iccleste/sounds/260982/ (iccleste )This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (Creative Commons 0 License). "oh!" (surprised guy) courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/Iceofdoom/sounds/371555/ (Iceofdoom )This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution License). "ooh-la-la" courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/Timbre/sounds/113169/ (Timbre )This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution License). "wait, what?" courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/InspectorJ/sounds/431168/ (InspectorJ )This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution License). "that’s correct" courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/bogenseeberg/sounds/475460/ (bogenseeberg )This work is...

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in this episode, we finally take a look at the wall placard to learn the name of the artist (Rosemarie Trockel) and the title she gave the work (Wasser : Water)... kristo also lets you know why it's better to avoid looking for the name of the artist and the title of the piece until AFTER you've had a chance to think about the work... you can find the transcripts for this episode along with show notes, credits and a few fun surprises right here ... awesome sound credits: https://thornandshout.bandcamp.com (Thorn & Shout): “http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Thorn__Shout/Thorn__Shout/THORN__SHOUT_-_Thorn__Shout_-_11_Farewell (Farewell)”"Farewell" by Thorn & Shout is licensed under a https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/ (Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License). "https://freesound.org/people/juror2/sounds/219819/ (really...?)" courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/juror2/ (juror2)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (Creative Commons 0 License). "https://freesound.org/people/Timbre/sounds/113169/ (ooh la la)" courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/Timbre (Timbre)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution Noncommercial License). "https://freesound.org/people/BlueSiren/sounds/377738/ (ugh, no)" courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/BlueSiren/ (BlueSiren)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (Creative Commons 0 License). "https://freesound.org/people/pycckuu20032003/sounds/77610/ (god damn it)" courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/pycckuu20032003 (pycckuu20032003)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/sampling+/1.0/ (Sampling+ License). “aha...” / “yeah...” / “wow...” / “woo...” all courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/Luckybastard (Luckybastard)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (Creative Commons 0 License). "https://freesound.org/people/afterguard/sounds/39960/ (what the hell is this?)" courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/afterguard (afterguard)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution License). sound of https://freesound.org/people/megashroom/sounds/390336/ (pouring-beer) courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/megashroom (megashroom) This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (Creative Commons 0 License). sound of https://freesound.org/people/BurghRecords/sounds/415151/ (running water) courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/BurghRecords (BurghRecords)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (Creative Commons 0 License). sounds of https://freesound.org/people/caquet/sounds/136299/ (sheep) / https://freesound.org/people/deleted_user_7146007/sounds/383725/ (sawing wood) / https://freesound.org/people/DeepPurple5/sounds/448975/ (flapping sail) courtesy of: SHEEP: https://freesound.org/people/caquet (caquet) (This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution License).) SAWING WOOD: https://freesound.org/people/deleted_user_7146007 (deleted_user_7146007) (This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (Creative Commons 0 License).) CANVAS: https://freesound.org/people/DeepPurple5 (DeepPurple5) (This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (Creative Commons 0 License).) sound of https://freesound.org/people/Littleboot/sounds/198091/ (polite applause) courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/Littleboot (Littleboot)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution License). “https://freesound.org/people/LG/sounds/69869/ (that’s nice...)" courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/LG (LG)This work is licensed under the...

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the stronger our first impressions—positive or negative—the more we should value the image that triggered them...and the closer we should look at both the image, and those impressions... Hi there...! You can find full show notes, the complete transcript and a few fun surprises https://kristo.art/podcast/6-a-study-in-burnt-orange-part-1 (right here...) awesome sound credits: https://thornandshout.bandcamp.com (Thorn & Shout): “http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Thorn__Shout/Thorn__Shout/THORN__SHOUT_-_Thorn__Shout_-_11_Farewell (Farewell)”"Farewell" by Thorn & Shout is licensed under a https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/ (Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License). “https://freesound.org/people/greenratt/sounds/34417/ (I don’t really care how you feel)” courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/greenratt/ (greenratt)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (Creative Commons 0 License). "https://freesound.org/people/juror2/sounds/219819/ (really...?)" courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/juror2/ (juror2)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (Creative Commons 0 License). "car bouncing on dirt road" : a mix courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/Robinhood76/sounds/181129/ (Robinhood76) and https://freesound.org/people/craigsmith/sounds/437984/ (craigsmith)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution Noncommercial License). "https://freesound.org/people/Adam_N/sounds/166129/ (huh...?)" courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/Adam_N/sounds/166129/ (Adam_N)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (Creative Commons 0 License). "https://freesound.org/people/InspectorJ/sounds/401989/ (mind the gap)" courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/InspectorJ/sounds/401989/ (InspectorJ)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution License). “https://freesound.org/people/ERH/sounds/46941/ (alright folks)” courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/ERH/sounds/46941/ (ERH)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution License). “https://freesound.org/people/clivew/sounds/62868/ (it’s really terrible)” courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/clivew/sounds/62868/ (clivew)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (Creative Commons 0 License). “https://freesound.org/people/Greencouch/sounds/124818/ (no, no, no that’s very bad)” courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/Greencouch/sounds/124818/ (Greencouch)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution License). “https://freesound.org/people/tim.kahn/sounds/155835/ (oh yeah)” courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/tim.kahn/ (tim.kahn and Amy Gedgaudas)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution License). “https://freesound.org/people/XTVSound/sounds/340858/ (wowowow)” courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/XTVSound/ (XTVSound)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (Creative Commons 0 License). golf swing and shout of "fore!" : mix courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/zolopher/sounds/75209/ (zolopher) and https://freesound.org/people/TRSdottie/sounds/418720/ (TRSdottie)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution License). https://freesound.org/people/Roses1401/sounds/449885/ (russian "I love you”) courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/Roses1401/ (Roses1401)This work is licensed under the https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (Attribution Noncommercial License). “https://freesound.org/people/kathid/sounds/167466/ (no way)” courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/kathid/ (kathid)This work is licensed under the...

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this painting has a depth of meaning that isn't easy to access... but once you do, it will change the way you look at EVERYTHING...! Interviews with the artist, Yan Pei-Ming: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/elena-cue/interview-with-yan-pei-mi_b_6978428.html?guccounter=1 (Elena Cué for HuffPost) 2015 https://web.archive.org/web/20080222220918/http://www.artzinechina.com/display_vol_aid357_en.html (David Barboza for artzine china) 2008 http://initiartmagazine.com/interview.php?IVarchive=6 (Selina Ting for initiArt Magazine) 2009 https://brooklynrail.org/2012/06/art/yan-pei-ming-with-charles-schultz (Charles Schultz for the Brooklyn Rail) 2012 https://www.artinamericamagazine.com/news-features/interviews/yan-pei-ming/ (Lisa Stahl for Art in America) http://www.artnet.com/artists/yan-pei-ming/biography (brief bio from artnet) 2015 more images of Yan Pei-Ming's paintings: https://dailyartfair.com/artist/yan-pei-ming https://dailyartfair.com/exhibition/5152/yan-pei-ming-massimo-de-carlo https://dailyartfair.com/exhibition/7925/yan-pei-ming-galerie-thaddaeus-ropac Some Good, Larger images of work by Yan Pei-Ming https://www.tuttartpitturasculturapoesiamusica.com/2018/09/Yan-Pei-Ming.html Significant links: https://www.google.com/search?biw=1325&bih=766&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=R3UDXfT-GuuT1fAP3qq4sAQ&q=francis+bacon+pope&oq=francis+bacon+&gs_l=img.1.4.0i67j0l9.118073.118903..121545...0.0..0.85.451.6......0....1..gws-wiz-img.6bnSN7brz6o (Francis Bacon Popes) https://www.artble.com/artists/diego_velazquez/paintings/portrait_of_pope_innocent_x (Velazquez: Pope Innocent X) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pope_Paul_III_and_His_Grandsons#/media/File:Titian_-_Pope_Paul_III_with_his_Grandsons_Alessandro_and_Ottavio_Farnese_-_WGA22985.jpg (Titian: Pope Paul III) Jacques-Louis David: Coronation of Napoleon: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Coronation_of_Napoleon https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Coronation_of_Napoleon#/media/File:David_-_L'Empereur_Napoleon_se_couronnant_lui-meme.png https://dailyartfair.com/exhibition/7220/yan-pei-ming-massimo-de-carlo (Yan Pei-Ming’s Napoleons) https://www.phaidon.com/resource/andyandmao.jpg (Andy Warhol and Mao) Warhol’s candy colored Mao portraits: https://guyhepner.com/artist/andy-warhol-art-prints-paintings/mao-by-andy-warhol/ https://www.masterworksfineart.com/educational-resources/andy-warhol/warhol-mao-series-1972/ https://www.wikiart.org/en/andy-warhol/mao-2 https://www.google.com/search?tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1326&bih=779&ei=9SUjXbveH4uNlwS0i7CICg&q=warhol+death+and+disaster&oq=warhol+de&gs_l=img.1.0.0l5j0i8i30l5.914.6898..9620...4.0..0.274.2507.0j11j3......0....1..gws-wiz-img.....0..0i10j0i30j0i5i30j0i24.zCvS-wVq8LI (Warhol’s Death & Disaster Series) https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Vincent_van_Gogh_-_Self-portrait_with_grey_felt_hat_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg (A great example of VanGogh’s brushwork) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screen_printing (Silkscreen painting) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Alexander_(painter) (Bill Alexander: Magic of Oil Painting) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Ross (Bob Ross: Joy of Oil Painting) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autonomous_sensory_meridian_response (autonomous sensory meridian response) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/They_Live (They Live) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_association_(psychology) (Freud's Free association method) more Warhol: https://www.moma.org/calendar/exhibitions/1517? https://uk.phaidon.com/agenda/art/articles/2013/february/22/the-fascinating-story-behind-andy-warhols-soup-cans/ Joseph Campbell explaining https://artpaintstuff.blogspot.com/2014/09/joseph-campbell-on-wings-of-artwhat-art.html (Joyce’s theory on pornographic art from his “Portrait of the Artist”) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_Revolution (China's Cultural Revolution)...

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this portrait of Mao is pretty enigmatic, and it had me wondering why anyone would feel the need to paint it...let alone want to buy it... I spend some time describing the painting and wondering aloud about what it might mean... listen in and get my take on what I call AngryArt... I also interview an otherwise innocent bystander to hear what he thinks... I'm glad I did... but that doesn't come until the next episode, which will be part 2 of this 2 part look at this very stormy painting of Mao... Links mentioned: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Museum_Ludwig (Cologne’s Museum Ludwig) http://www.phaidon.com/resource/andyandmao.jpg (Andy Warhol and Mao) Warhol’s candy colored Mao portraits: https://guyhepner.com/artist/andy-warhol-art-prints-paintings/mao-by-andy-warhol/ (guyhepner.com) https://www.masterworksfineart.com/educational-resources/andy-warhol/warhol-mao-series-1972/ (masterworksfineart.com) https://www.wikiart.org/en/andy-warhol/mao-2 (wikiart.org) pixellation and artists: https://www.wikiart.org/en/chuck-close/phil-1976 (A portrait by Chuck Close) https://www.google.com/search?tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1824&bih=951&ei=H7gEXYmhJO-m_QaKmb6gBA&q=david+hockney+collage&oq=david+hockney&gs_l=img.1.8.0l10.9314.12866..17425...0.0..0.282.2488.0j13j1......0....1..gws-wiz-img.....0.rXseJiGtmjc (Collages by David Hockney) https://www.google.com/search?biw=1824&bih=951&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=MbgEXf6hO6aL5wLzobPIBA&q=gerhard+richter+fenster+k%C3%B6lner+dom&oq=gerhard+richter+fenster&gs_l=img.1.2.0i19l3.64676.72335..75217...0.0..0.179.3947.0j23......0....1..gws-wiz-img.......0j0i67j0i10i67j0i30j0i24.lCb1cqUw9gA (Gerhard Richter’s pixellated stained glass window) https://www.gerhard-richter.com/en/art/paintings/photo-paintings/baader-meinhof-56 (Richter’s Baader-Meinhof paintings) (the ones I first saw at the museum in Boston) https://www.wikiart.org/en/sigmar-polke (Sigmar Polke) https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Vincent_van_Gogh_-_Self-portrait_with_grey_felt_hat_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg (A great example of VanGogh’s brushwork) A definition of: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sturm_und_Drang (Sturm und Drang) Who is: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yan_Pei-Ming (Yan Pei-Ming) https://dailyartfair.com/artist/yan-pei-ming (Lots more work by Yan Pei-Ming) https://www.tuttartpitturasculturapoesiamusica.com/2018/09/Yan-Pei-Ming.html (Some Good, Larger images of work by Yan Pei-Ming) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1989_Tiananmen_Square_protests (Tiananmen Square protests (1989)) Sound links: “roger that” courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/theuncertainman/ (theuncertainman) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ (This work is licensed under the Attribution License) “http://soundbible.com/916-Perfect-Thunder-Storm.html (sturm und drang thunder strike)” courtesy of Mike Koenig https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ (This work is licensed under the Attribution License) “sturm und dang screams” courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/thanvannispen/ (thanvannispen) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ (This work is licensed under the Attribution License) “single scream” courtesy of Richard Frohlich https://freesound.org/people/FreqMan/ (FreqMan) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ (This work is licensed under the Attribution License) Awesome outro music:by http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Inaequalis/ (Inaequalis) titled http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Inaequalis/Bte_Noire/Check_me_out ("Check Me Out") (from their https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Inaequalis/Bte_Noire/ (Bête Noire) album)licensed under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License).

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I’ll be be visiting museums and galleries and meeting individual paintings and sculptures… some of them will be old friends… but most of them will be works I’ve never met before or know anything about… and they’re all gonna be talking to me… and when you listen in on my conversations, you’ll find the art saying something interesting and personal to you, too… you’ll not only be seeing these works through my eyes and my intuition, you’re going to learn how to do this for yourself… —in ANY museum and with ANY work of art— transcripts and links at: https://kristo.art/podcast/3-a-cocktail-party-for-introverts (kristo.art) Special thanks to: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Inaequalis/ (Inaequalis) for http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Inaequalis/Bte_Noire/Swoon (Swoon) (from their  https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Inaequalis/Bte_Noire/ (Bête Noire) album) it's music that will rock your world...! licensed under the Creative Commons http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License)
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