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Category: Books
New

All Of It

from WNYC
384
Avg Episode Length: 22 min
Most recent episode: Jan 26, 2023 04:47 PM
Last Checked: Within the last few hours
Language: en-us Explicit: no Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: ALL OF IT is a show about culture and its consumers.

ALL OF IT is a show about culture and context.

ALL OF IT is a show about culture and the culture.

Our aim is to engage the thinkers, doers, makers, and creators, about the what and why of their work. People make the culture and we hope, need, and want the WNYC community to be a part of our show. As we build a community around ALL OF IT, we know that every guest and listener has an opinion. We won’t always agree, but our varied perspectives and diversity of experience is what makes New York City great.

ALL OF IT will be both companion for and curator of the myriad culture this city has to offer. In the words of Cristina De Rossi, anthropologist at Barnet and Southgate College, London:

Culture encompasses religion, food, what we wear, how we wear it, our language, marriage, music, what we believe is right or wrong, how we sit at the table, how we greet visitors, how we behave with loved ones, and a million other things.

...In other words, ALL OF IT.

---

Join us for ALL OF IT with Alison Stewart, weekdays from 12:00 - 2:00PM on WNYC.

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384 Episodes
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All Of It


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[REBROADCAST FROM 1/4]: We're kicking off our 2023 Get Lit season with the latest from Pulitzer Prize winning biographer Stacy Schiff, The Revolutionary: Samuel Adams. Schiff joins us for a preview conversation to discuss the book ahead of our January 31st Get Lit event with musical guest Rosanne Cash. Grab your free tickets now!


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A new photography exhibit called 'This is Home' opened at Flushing Town Hall this past weekend. Featuring work from photographers Janice Chung, An Rong Xu, and Cindy Trinh, the show centers around themes of community and home in Manhattan's Chinatown and in Flushing. Here to walk through the exhibit is photographer Cindy Trinh and Arts Director of Flushing Town Hall Daniel Bamba. The exhibit will be on view until February 26th, Monday-Friday 12-5pm, and admission is free.


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The Museum of Chinese in America has compiled selections from their fashion and costume collections for The Winter Show 2023. Called 'What We Wore in the Beautiful Country,' hand-embroidered traditional dresses and ornate opera gowns tell the story of early immigration of Chinese people to America. Curator Herb Tam and president of MOCA Nancy Yao join to discuss. You can purchase tickets to attend The Winter Show and view the exhibit here.


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Karen Baum Gordon's father escaped the Holocaust -- but not its psychological legacy. She joins us to discuss her book, "The Last Letter," which chronicles his experiences -- and examines what it means to remember.


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With the news of a new H Mart opening on the Upper East Side, food writer Eric Kim joins to talk about the importance of H Mart in Asian American culture and what he loves about shopping there. We'll also take listener calls.


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For this month's installment of Full Bio, we speak with John A. Farrell, author of the new biography, Ted Kennedy: A Life, about the former Massachusetts senator and presidential candidate. On the final day, we speak about Kennedy's run for president in 1980, his famous convention speeches in both 1980 and 2008, and his battle with brain cancer towards the end of his life.


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A new book tells the history of the Rikers Island jail from the perspective of the people who have worked and lived in and around the complex. Journalists Graham Rayman and Reuven Blau join us to discuss, Rikers: An Oral History.


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For this month's installment of Full Bio, we speak with John A. Farrell, author of the new biography, Ted Kennedy: A Life, about the former Massachusetts senator and presidential candidate. On Day three, we speak about Kennedy's personal demons and controversies, including his excessive drinking, and the infamous Chappaquiddick incident which resulted in the death of Kennedy's acquaintance, Mary Jo Kopechne.


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New York Times awards show columnist Kyle Buchanan joins to discuss the nominees for this year's Academy Awards as well as give us a sense of how award season is going so far.


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Over the past month, George Santos, rookie Republican congressman for New York's third district, has been accused of various eyebrow raising lies about his background, like whether or not he is Jewish, if his mother was in a World Trade Center during 9/11, or if he really worked for Goldman Sachs, and that's just to name a few. He's also been accused of violating campaign finance law. Santos has faced calls to resign, but up until he now he has been relatively quiet. Brigid Bergin, senior reporter on the People and Power desk for WNYC/Gothamist who is covering this story, joins to catch us up on the latest of this scandal and the implications of Santos's alleged lies.

1
New

Fresh Air

from NPR
339
Avg Episode Length: 46 min
Most recent episode: Jan 26, 2023 02:16 PM
Last Checked: Within the last few hours
Language: en Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radios most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with todays biggest luminaries.Subscribe to Fresh Air Plus! Youll be supporting the unique show you cant get enough of - and you can listen sponsor-free. Learn more at plus.npr.org/freshair

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09-01-2022 "Classic"
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339 Episodes
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Fresh Air


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Washington Post technology reporter Drew Harwell says the unpublished report shows that tech companies didn't respond to employees' warnings about violent rhetoric on their platforms.

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Author Jeff Guinn has written about cult leaders Charles Manson and Jim Jones. In the book, Waco, he draws on new interviews with federal agents and surviving Branch Davidians to revisit the 1993 confrontation, which left scores of people dead, including more than 20 children.

Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new Peacock series Poker Face, starring Natasha Lyonne.

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F. Murray Abraham won the 1985 Best Actor Oscar for Amadeus. Now he co-stars in The White Lotus as Bert, a chauvinistic patriarch on vacation in Italy with his son and grandson. We talk about his career and life, and the lessons he learned along the way.

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After Hurricane Katrina in 2006, hundreds of workers from India were promised jobs and green cards in what labor organizer Saket Soni calls "one of the largest cases of forced labor in modern U.S. history." He tells their story in The Great Escape.

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We'll talk about the latest developments and strategies in the fight over abortion rights with Mary Ziegler, who has written several books on the law, history and politics of abortion. Her new book, Roe: The History of a National Obsession, is about how abortion has remained at the center of America's culture wars and political battles.

Also, we'll hear from writer Jonathan Escoffery. His semi-autobiographical collection of stories, If I Survive You, is on our book critic Maureen Corrigan's list of the best books of 2022. The main character, like Escoffery, is the American-born son of Jamaican immigrants, trying to figure out how race and racism work in America, and where he's supposed to fit.

Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a new solo album from pianist and composer Kenny Baron.

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Rachael & Vilray's new album, I Love a Love Song, features them with a jazz ensemble. Most of their songs sound like something you would have heard on the radio in the '30s and '40s. Rachael is also the lead singer of the group Lake Street Dive. They spoke with Sam Briger in 2020.

Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel This Other Eden, by Paul Harding, and Justin Chang reviews the new film Women Talking.

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Historian Matthew Connelly says government records are marked as "classified" three times every second — and many of them will never be declassified. We talk about what that means for the public and how this might change. His new book is The Declassification Engine.

Also, John Powers reviews the French courtroom drama film Saint Omer by Alice Diop.

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New York Times congressional correspondent Catie Edmondson says the new Republican-controlled House of Representatives will likely leverage their subpoena power to enact vengeance on the Biden administration. "The next two years is not going to be defined by governing and legislating. It is going to be defined by obstruction and clashes of personalities and investigation," she says.

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Legal historian Mary Ziegler has chronicled the legal, political and cultural battles around abortion, and says the debate is far from over: "We're at a moment of almost unprecedented uncertainty in the United States when it comes to abortion," Zielger says. Her book is Roe: The History of a National Obsession.

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Princeton African American Studies professor Imani Perry says the South can be seen as an "origin point" for the way the nation operates. Her book, South to America, reflects on the region's history and traces the steps of an enslaved ancestor. "The South in some ways becomes the repository for the nation's sins, right?" she says. "And then it allows the rest of the country to conceive of itself as relatively pristine." South to America won the National Book Award for nonfiction in 2022.

Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews pianist Kenny Barron's album The Source.
1
New

Fun Kids Book Worms

from Fun Kids
107
Avg Episode Length: 24 min
Most recent episode: Jan 25, 2023 06:00 AM
Last Checked: Within the last few hours
Language: en-GB Explicit: clean Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: Join Bex from the childrens radio station Fun Kids as she meets top authors who tell her about their books and also read us chapters from them.

Plus, Bex and friends recommend their favourite kids books of the month.

You can listen to Bex on Fun Kids (weekdays from 4pm) on DAB Digital Radio across the UK, on the free Fun Kids app, and online at funkidslive.com

Plus, when you become a Fun Kids Podcasts Plus subscriber, you get this show – and 30 others! – ad-free and support the work Fun Kids does in bringing you high-quality, entertaining, and safe content for your family. Find out more at FunKidsLive.com/plus

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Premiere
Your Digital Marketing Coach with Neal Schaffer
This podcast includes advice on a broad range of topics all with the commonality of being related to digital marketing and having actionable takeaways for your business. For marketing professionals, agencies, entrepreneurs, and business owners.
#Marketing #Entrepreneurship #Management #Business
107 Episodes
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Fun Kids Book Worms


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Welcome to another episode of Book Worms! This week, Bex is chatting to Elle McNicolll on Like A Curse. What inspired the characters and what can we expect from her stirring sequel? Join Elle on her first time in the Fun Kids studio! 

Plus, we have Lis Jardine on The Detention Detectives! Find out what Lis Jardine adores most about this novel, and what to expect in this murder mystery... 

We have some of Bex's book recommendations too! Tune in to find out what Bex has been loving this month. 

Join Fun Kids Podcasts+: https://funkidslive.com/plus

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.


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Happy 2023! This week on the first Book Worms episode of the year, Bex chats to Abi Elphinstone on her new book Saving Neverland! Find out how Abi felt reading the original Peter Pan, challenges writing his character, and what themes arise in this new tale...

Bex talks us through her favourite books, including Blanksy the Street Cat by Gavin Puckett and her book of the month, Like A Curse by Elle McNicoll. Listen to hear why Bex adores these books! 

Join Fun Kids Podcasts+: https://funkidslive.com/plus

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.


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In this special throwback episode of Book Worms, Bex gets reflective and takes a trip down memory lane with highlights from this year.

Kicking off the show, Alison Hammond talks about her fantastic book on black people in British history Black in Time, documenting the figures you probably haven't heard about in history lessons. Ben Miller talks about his book The Night We Got Stuck in a Story while Bex fires a round of riddles! Christopher Edge talks us through the themes and characters in Escape Room, and finally Benjamin Dean chats on seeing The Secret Sunshine Project in book shop windows and what aspects of his life inspired the story.

Celebrate the fabulous guests and novels we've had this year and look forward to a 2023 FULL of new books!!

Join Fun Kids Podcasts+: https://funkidslive.com/plus

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.


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This week on Book Worms Bex talks to A.F. Steadman, author of Skandar and the Unicorn Thief, on her writing process and her likes and dislikes in a quick-fire 'this or that' round! Plus a glimpse into her next book... 

Historicist and author Greg Jenner gives us a reading from his new book You Are History - what disgusting substance did Victorians use for jewellery??? 

Join Fun Kids Podcasts+: https://funkidslive.com/plus

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Book Worms is the fortnightly show where we meet some of your favourite authors, find out the stories behind their stories, and hear exclusive readings too!

Plus, when you become a Fun Kids Podcasts Plus subscriber, you get this show ad-free along with 30 others – and get to support Fun Kids. Find out more at FunKidsLive.com/plus

Join Fun Kids Podcasts+: https://funkidslive.com/plus

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.


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On this week's episode of Book Worms, Bex tackles the topics of arguments and how best to have them in an interview with Matthew Sayed and Kathy Weeks! Bex and the duo discuss the inspirations behind Matthew's book What Do YOU Think?, where we delve into Matthew and Kathy's ideas on opinions and how to wield them. 

Brilliant author Abi Elphinstone reads an excerpt from her new book, Saving Neverland, and takes us through the spellbinding themes and characters in a summary of the novel! This week is one to tune in to! 

Join Fun Kids Podcasts+: https://funkidslive.com/plus

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.


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This week on Book Worms, Adam B chats to Emma Louise about the inspiration for his new book, Adam Wins the Internet! He chats about visiting his old primary school, what to expect on his new book tour, and gives us an inside look at an excerpt from Adam Wins the Internet! 

Join Fun Kids Podcasts+: https://funkidslive.com/plus

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Fearne Cotton joins us this week to chat more about the connection between a happy healthy mind and body, and the kings of comedy themselves Craig Graham and Mike Stirling aka. I.P. Daley from the Beano chat to us about the latest shenanigans Dennis and Gnasher are up to! 

Join Fun Kids Podcasts+: https://funkidslive.com/plus

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Tom Fletcher joins us with a brand new book that is out of this world, Spaceband! This features exclusive songs you can listen to as well! We also have friend of the show Robin Stevens join us with her latest book in the Murder Most Unladylike series, and as always we have a list of some of the best new book releases! 

Join Fun Kids Podcasts+: https://funkidslive.com/plus

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.


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Have you ever wanted to go to SPACE? David Walliams chats all things space and uncovers his favourite crisp flavour (will Bex cancel the interview because of it?) AND we hear from the brilliant Reece Carter about his spooky new book just in time for Halloween, A Girl The Ghost and the Lost Name! 

Join Fun Kids Podcasts+: https://funkidslive.com/plus

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

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New

The New Yorker Radio Hour

from WNYC Studios and The New Yorker
181
Avg Episode Length: 25 min
Most recent episode: Jan 24, 2023 06:00 AM
Last Checked: Jan 25, 2023 11:11 AM
Language: en-us Explicit: no Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: David Remnick is joined by The New Yorker’s award-winning writers, editors and artists to present a weekly mix of profiles, storytelling, and insightful conversations about the issues that matter — plus an occasional blast of comic genius from the magazine’s legendary Shouts and Murmurs page. The New Yorker has set a standard in journalism for generations and The New Yorker Radio Hour gives it a voice on public radio for the first time. Produced by The New Yorker and WNYC Studios. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin, Nancy and many more. © WNYC Studios

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The New Yorker Radio Hour


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Despite years of controversy, the Academy Awards and the other awards shows remain must-watch television for many Americans. The awards may be “unreliable as a pure measure of cinematic worth,” Schulman tells David Remnick. “But I would argue that the Oscars are sort of a decoder ring for cultural conflict and where the industry is headed,” Schulman says. “They are a way to understand where pop culture is.” With theatre attendance in continuing decline, the Academy is looking for solutions, Schulman believes, and that could result in a higher-grossing outlier winner for the coveted Best Picture award. Plus, a visit with the Broadway composer Charles Strouse, who is ninety-four and compiling his archives to donate to the Library of Congress. He reflects on his work with Jay-Z and his “friendly enemy” relationship with Stephen Sondheim: “He didn’t like me much. I didn’t like him less.” Still nimble at the piano, Strouse plays a rendition of his classic, “Tomorrow.”


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George Santos is hardly the first scammer elected to office—but his lies, David Remnick says, are “extra.” Most Americans learned of Santos’s extraordinary fabrications from a New York Times report published after the midterm election, but a local newspaper called the North Shore Leader was sounding the alarm months before. The New Yorker staff writer Clare Malone took a trip to Long Island to speak with the Leader’s publisher, Grant Lally, and its managing editor, Maureen Daly, to find out how the story began. “We heard story after story after story about him doing bizarre things,” Lally told her. “He was so well known, at least in the more active political circles, to be a liar, that by early summer he was already being called George Scamtos.” Lally explains how redistricting drama in New York State turned Santos from a “sacrificial” candidate—to whom no one was paying attention—to a front-runner. At the same time, Malone thinks, “the oddly permissive structure that the Republican Party has created for candidates on a gamut of issues” enabled his penchant for fabrication. “[There’s] lots of crazy stuff that’s popped up in politics over the past few years. I think maybe Santos thought, Eh, who’s gonna check?”


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Deepti Kapoor describes New Delhi, the setting of her novel “Age of Vice” as “extremely beautiful, but also violent. . . . It’s a place where you think you’re gonna get cheated and robbed until someone does something incredibly kind and breaks your heart.” The highly anticipated book, published simultaneously in twenty countries this month, is part crime thriller, part family saga centered on a reckless playboy who wants to break away from his mob family; a young man working as a servant to him; and a naïve young journalist. Kapoor, who spent a decade as a journalist herself, tells Parul Sehgal that she wrote the book while living abroad—needing the distance from her country in order to see it more clearly.


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It wasn’t so long ago that Ronald Reagan was considered over the hill, too old to govern. Now a sitting President has turned eighty in office, and a Presidential contest between Joe Biden and Donald Trump would put two near-eighty-year-olds against each other. (Trump—while denying President Biden’s fitness—commented, “Life begins at eighty.”) Yet the question of age has not disappeared; even some of Biden’s ardent supporters have expressed concerns about him starting a second term. David Remnick talks with the gerontologist Jack Rowe, a professor at Columbia University who also founded Harvard Medical School’s Division on Aging, about how to evaluate a candidate’s competency for office; and with Jill Lepore and Jane Mayer, keen observers of the Presidency. Rowe argues that ageism underlies the public discourse; an occasional slip or unsteadiness, he thinks, is not consequential to the job. “If I give you a seventy-eight-year-old man with a history of heart disease, you don’t know if he’s in a nursing home or on the Supreme Court of the United States,” he tells Remnick. But Lepore and Mayer argue public opinion, and not only medical prognosis, should be considered seriously as we look at aging politicians. If Biden and Trump face off, Lepore says, “Age won’t be an issue between them. But age will be an issue for American voters. . . . I think of the young people that I teach everyday. They will be furious.” Mayer sees something anti-democratic in play as well. “Incumbency is such an advantage at this point,” she notes, that “it leads to gerontocracy,” because “it’s really hard to unseat someone.”


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Forty-six years ago, a young photographer named Marilyn Nance got the opportunity of a lifetime. A student at the Pratt Institute, an art school in Brooklyn, Nance had never left the country. But she became one of the official photographers documenting a festival in Lagos, Nigeria, called FESTAC ’77. The monthlong festival featured artists from across Africa and the diaspora, and has been described as the most important Black cultural event of the twentieth century. But, on returning from the festival, Nance didn’t find any takers to publish her photos, and fifty years later, few people know it took place. “I thought I would be talking about FESTAC in 1978, not in 2022,” Nance told the staff writer Julian Lucas. “If some tragic thing had happened, everybody would remember. . . . But I guess maybe there was no investment in celebrating Black joy.” A collection of Nance’s photographs from the event was published late in 2022, in the book “Last Day in Lagos.” 


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Bob Woodward is not one to editorialize. But, during his interviews with Donald Trump at the time of the COVID-19 crisis, Woodward found himself shouting at the President—explaining how to make a decision and trying to browbeat him into listening to public-health experts. Woodward has released audio recordings of some of their interviews in a new audiobook called “The Trump Tapes,” which documents details of Trump’s state of mind, and also of Woodward’s process and craft. “I could call him anytime, [and] he would call me,” Woodward tells David Remnick. His wife, Elsa Walsh, “used to joke [that] there’s three of us in the marriage.” And, in the wake of Damar Hamlin’s accident, the staff writer Louisa Thomas talks with David Remnick about an uncomfortable truth: football’s danger to players is part of its singular popularity. 


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When the renowned choreographer Akram Khan was commissioned to update the classic “Giselle” for the English National Ballet, he couldn’t simply put new steps to a Romantic-era plot. Beautiful as it is, “Giselle” has a view of ideal womanhood that is insupportable in our century—and it didn’t reflect the women he knew.  In Khan’s 2016 “Giselle,” the title character doesn’t chastely expire from a broken heart; she is a strong woman victimized by more powerful men.  The story still culminates in an act of forgiveness, but in a way that resonates with the era of #MeToo. Vincenzo Lamagna composed the production’s new score. The producer Ngofeen Mputubwele describes the production as not simply a great modern ballet but a model for how to reimagine a story that doesn’t work anymore.


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We draw meaning and comfort from traditions, but when the world changes, traditions can stop reflecting our values and cause us pain. This episode features three people struggling against traditions that have become problematic.  The producer Ngofeen Mputubwele talks with Jeanna Kadlec, the author of “Heretic,” a memoir of leaving the evangelical church; and the actor Britton Smith, a leader of Broadway Advocacy Coalition, which seeks to make Broadway an equitable workplace for performers of color. “The fire was loud and the reckoning was very visible to everyone,” Smith tells Mputubwele. “The fire crumbled into ashes, and now the ashes are starting to settle.”


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Tracy K. Smith was named Poet Laureate in 2017, at the beginning of the fierce partisan divide of the Trump era. She quickly turned to her craft to address the deep political divisions the election laid bare, putting together a collection called “American Journal: Fifty Poems for Our Time.” Then she hit the road, visiting community centers, senior centers, prisons, and colleges, and reading poems written by herself and others for groups small and large. “It was exhausting, and exhilarating, and it was probably the best thing I could have done as an American,” she told The New Yorker’s poetry editor, Kevin Young.  

This segment originally aired July 5, 2019.


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As the guitarist for the Roots, the band for “The Tonight Show,” Kirk Douglas plays anything and everything. So David Remnick put him to the test on some holiday classics. And two longtime New Yorker staffers, Patricia Marx and Roz Chast, divulge their celebrated history playing together in a ukulele band. As the Daily Pukuleles, they claim, they influenced some of the biggest names in music in the sixties and beyond. But they were always a little too far ahead of the curve for the mainstream.

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New

Pod and Prejudice

from Molly Burdick
91
Avg Episode Length: 59 min
Most recent episode: Jan 24, 2023 05:00 AM
Last Checked: Within the last few hours
Language: en Explicit: yes Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: Becca has read all of Jane Austens work. Molly literally does not know who Mrs. Bennett is. Together, they venture into Austens world of romance, biting satire, and class struggles. Like Austen? Interested in a modern take? This is the podcast for you!

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Pod and Prejudice


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Frank Churchill finally comes to visit, and Emma picks up on some vibes. Plus, we get some hot goss about Jane Fairfax. Topics discussed include what kind of dog Emma is and which Gilmore guy Frank is.

Study questions: Topics discussed include Emma's reaction to Harriet's visit with the Martins, first impressions of Frank, why/how Frank visited, Frank's relationship to Highbury, the VIBES, and some predictions about Jane and Mr. Dixon.

Funniest quote: "Her own father’s perfect exemption from any thought of the kind, the entire deficiency in him of all such sort of penetration or suspicion, was a most comfortable circumstance. Happily he was not farther from approving matrimony than from foreseeing it.—Though always objecting to every marriage that was arranged, he never suffered beforehand from the apprehension of any; it seemed as if he could not think so ill of any two persons’ understanding as to suppose they meant to marry till it were proved against them."

Questions moving forward: What's going on between Frank and Jane? What's going on between Jane and Mr. Dixon? What's going to happen with the Martins?

Who wins the chapters? The Weston boys!

Glossary of People, Places, and Things: Eminem, Leonardo DiCaprio, Eric Andre, Dominic Cooper, Matt Czuchry, Prince Hal

Next Episode: Vol. II Chapters 7-8 OR Chapters 25-26

Our show art was created by Torrence Browne, and our audio is produced by Graham Cook. For bios and transcripts, check out our website at podandprejudice.com. Pod and Prejudice is transcribed by speechdocs.com. To support the show, check out our Patreon!

Instagram: @podandprejudice

Twitter: @podandprejudice

Facebook: Pod and Prejudice

Youtube: Pod and Prejudice

Merch store: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/pod-and-prejudice?ref_id=23216


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Mr. Elton is getting married! Harriet ran into the Martins! Plus, Emma and Knightley debrief on the party, Jane Fairfax and Miss Bates come to visit, and we learn about Miss Hawkins. Topics discussed include boiled pork and Schrödinger's Biological Father.

Study questions: Topics discussed include why Knightley wants Emma to befriend Jane, the drama between Jane and Mr. Dixon, the merits of Mr. Elton's match, predictions about Mrs. Elton, and Emma's reaction to Harriet seeing Robert.

Funniest quote: “She wished him very well, but he gave her pain, and his welfare twenty miles off would administer most satisfaction.”

Questions moving forward: Augusta Hawkins: WHOMST? What's going to happen when Harriet visits the Martins? Why does Knightley want Jane and Emma to be friends?

Who wins the chapters? Elizabeth Martin

Glossary of People, Places, and Things: The Napoleonic Wars, Schrödinger's Cat, Teardrops on My Guitar, The Office

Next Episode: Vol. II Chapters 5-6 OR Chapters 23-24

Our show art was created by Torrence Browne, and our audio is produced by Graham Cook. For bios and transcripts, check out our website at podandprejudice.com. Pod and Prejudice is transcribed by speechdocs.com. To support the show, check out our Patreon!

Instagram: @podandprejudice

Twitter: @podandprejudice

Facebook: Pod and Prejudice

Youtube: Pod and Prejudice

Merch store: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/pod-and-prejudice?ref_id=23216


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Emma and Harriet visit the Bateses, and we get our first true introduction to Jane Fairfax. Topics discussed include chilled beans, cross-writing, what war was taking place when Emma was written, nuns, and why Emma might hate Jane.

Study questions: Topics discussed include the Bateses purpose and why they talk too much, the children with dead parents of Highbury, and Jane Fairfax's class and romantic situation.

Funniest quote: “Yes, so I imagined. I was afraid there could be little chance of my hearing any thing of Miss Fairfax to-day.”

Questions moving forward: Who is Jane Fairfax and who will she fall in love with? Does she know Mr. Elton? Does she know Frank Churchill? Where's Harriet?

Who wins the chapters? Mr. Knightley ;)

Glossary of Terms and Phrases:

huswife (n): a small case containing scissors, thread, needles, and other sewing things.

Glossary of People, Places, and Things: Spongebob, A League of Their Own, Bridgerton, Keira Knightley, Jennifer Ehle

Next Episode: Vol. II Chapters 3-4 OR Chapters 21-22

Our show art was created by Torrence Browne, and our audio is produced by Graham Cook. For bios and transcripts, check out our website at podandprejudice.com. Pod and Prejudice is transcribed by speechdocs.com. To support the show, check out our Patreon!

Instagram: @podandprejudice

Twitter: @podandprejudice

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Youtube: Pod and Prejudice

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Mr. Elton leaves for Bath, Emma comes clean to Harriet about Elton's true feelings and Knightley and Emma discuss Frank Churchill's circumstances. Plus, the intro of our new segment, There Are Always Dogs: A Doc Update.

Study questions: Topics discussed include Elton's departure and Harriet and Emma's reactions to it, whether or not Frank will visit, who's right: Emma or Knightley, why Knightley hates Franks, class status and power, love, and the institution of marriage.

Funniest quote: "Mr. Frank Churchill did not come."

Questions moving forward: Is Elton coming back? Is Frank Churchill coming? Will Martin come back? Is Emma going to continue matchmaking?

Who wins the chapters? Harriet and Knightley

Glossary of Terms and Phrases:

penance (n): a voluntary self-punishment as repentance for having done wrong

Glossary of People, Places, and Things: A League of Their Own, Dyking Out, A League of Their Own Recap Podcast, Andor, Bridget Jones' Diary, Sequoia Simone, Clueless, Bridgerton, Leonardo DiCaprio, Taylor Swift

Next Episode: Volume II Chapters 1-2 OR Chapters 19-20

Pod and Prejudice is sponsored by Athletic Greens. To get a full year's supply of Vitamin D AND 5 free travel packs with your first purchase of AG1, head on over to athleticgreens.com/WHOMST.

Our show art was created by Torrence Browne, and our audio is produced by Graham Cook. For bios and transcripts, check out our website at podandprejudice.com. Pod and Prejudice is transcribed by speechdocs.com. To support the show, check out our Patreon!

Instagram: @podandprejudice

Twitter: @podandprejudice

Facebook: Pod and Prejudice

Youtube: Pod and Prejudice

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We travel back to Hartfield in the snow, Elton professes his love to Emma (Molly was right!), and Emma overthinks it. Topics discussed include Austen's relationship with clergymen, Emma's knowledge of real love, and Dean Forester as Mr. Elton. Question for the group: is it octopi or octopuses?

Study questions: Elton's proposal, his feelings for Emma, why Elton is insulted by the idea of Harriet, Emma's moment of reflection, and Emma's matchmaking career.

Funniest Quote: “Indeed!” replied he. “Then, my dear Isabella, it is the most extraordinary sort of thing in the world, for in general every thing does give you cold. Walk home!—you are prettily shod for walking home, I dare say."

Questions Moving Forward: Will Emma matchmake again? What is she going to tell Harriet?

Who wins the chapters? Emma

Glossary of Terms and Phrases:

eclat (n): social distinction or conspicuous success

Glossary of People, Places, and Things: Octopussy, Modern Family, Ironic, Inside Out, Twilight, Over the Garden Wall, Gilmore Girls

Next Episode: Chapters 17-18

Pod and Prejudice is sponsored by Athletic Greens. To get a full year's supply of Vitamin D AND 5 free travel packs with your first purchase of AG1, head on over to athleticgreens.com/WHOMST.

Our show art was created by Torrence Browne, and our audio is produced by Graham Cook. For bios and transcripts, check out our website at podandprejudice.com. Pod and Prejudice is transcribed by speechdocs.com. To support the show, check out our Patreon!

Instagram: @podandprejudice

Twitter: @podandprejudice

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We go to Randalls for dinner! Harriet is sick, John Knightley hints to Emma that Elton has feelings for her, and we learn a bit more about Frank Churchill.

Study questions: Topics discussed include Elton's CROOSH, why Emma hasn't noticed and why John has, why Emma has her sights set on Frank, Mrs. Churchill, Frank's familial loyalties, and whether or not he will visit.

Funniest Quote: "I am sure I never think of that poor young man without the greatest compassion. To be constantly living with an ill-tempered person, must be dreadful. It is what we happily have never known any thing of."

Questions Moving Forward: Will Frank visit? Will Emma actually like him? Will Harriet get better? What's gonna happen with Elton?

Who wins the chapters? John Knightley

Glossary of People, Places, and Things: Michel Gerard, The Half of It, Emily Hampshire

Next Episode: Chapters 15-16

Pod and Prejudice is sponsored by Athletic Greens. To get a full year's supply of Vitamin D AND 5 free travel packs with your first purchase of AG1, head on over to athleticgreens.com/WHOMST.

Our show art was created by Torrence Browne, and our audio is produced by Graham Cook. For bios and transcripts, check out our website at podandprejudice.com. Pod and Prejudice is transcribed by speechdocs.com. To support the show, check out our Patreon!

Instagram: @podandprejudice

Twitter: @podandprejudice

Facebook: Pod and Prejudice

Youtube: Pod and Prejudice

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In chapters 11 and 12 of Emma, Isabella and John Knightley come to visit, we witness the battle of Wingfield v. Perry, and Emma and Knightley try to keep the peace. Topics discussed include gruel, mostly, and the mystery of Jane Fairfax.

Study Questions: Topics discussed include the purpose of John and Isabella, what we've learned about Emma, why Knightley forgives Emma and how they operate together in the story, and the Churchills.

Funniest Quote: "And for a little while she hoped he would not talk of it, and that a silent rumination might suffice to restore him to the relish of his own smooth gruel."

Questions Moving Forward: Why do people hate the Churchills? Will Frank come to visit? What's up with Harriet and Elton?

Who Wins the Chapters? Emma and Knightley

Glossary of Terms and Phrases:

forbearance (n): patient self-control; restraint and tolerance

philippic (n): a bitter attack or denunciation

Glossary of People, Places, and Things: Gilmore Girls, Celine Dion, Goldilocks, Fiddler on the Roof, Aladdin, Mean Girls

Next Episode: Chapters 13-14

Pod and Prejudice is sponsored by Athletic Greens. To get a full year's supply of Vitamin D AND 5 free travel packs with your first purchase of AG1, head on over to athleticgreens.com/WHOMST.

Our show art was created by Torrence Browne, and our audio is produced by Graham Cook. For bios and transcripts, check out our website at podandprejudice.com. Pod and Prejudice is transcribed by speechdocs.com. To support the show, check out our Patreon!

Instagram: @podandprejudice

Twitter: @podandprejudice

Facebook: Pod and Prejudice

Youtube: Pod and Prejudice

Merch store: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/pod-and-prejudice?ref_id=23216


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In this week's episode, discussing chapters 9 and 10 of Emma, Elton writes a poem, Emma and Harriet visit a poor family, and Emma ties her shoes a bunch. Topics discussed include book club, Molly's new CROOSH, potential ace representation, and inklings of Jane Fairfax.

Study Questions: Topics discussed include Elton's poem, Harriet's change of heart, Emma's relationship with her dad, Elton's motives, Emma's marriage monologue, Jane Fairfax, and Molly's qualm with Emma.

Funniest Quote: "The course of true love never did run smooth. A Hartfield edition of Shakespeare would have a long note on that passage." OR "Emma was very compassionate; and the distresses of the poor were as sure of relief from her personal attention and kindness, her counsel and her patience, as from her purse."

Questions Moving Forward: Who does Elton like? Is Mr. Martin coming back? Who is Jane Fairfax?

Who Wins the Chapters? Emma!

Glossary of Terms and Phrases:

crisis (n): a time when a difficult or important decision must be made

Glossary of People, Places, and Things: The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, Perry the Platypus, The Great Believers, The Power of Geography, The Great British Baking Show, Chopped, TJ Klune, Gilmore Girls

Next Episode: Chapters 11-12

Pod and Prejudice is sponsored by Athletic Greens. To get a full year's supply of Vitamin D AND 5 free travel packs with your first purchase of AG1, head on over to athleticgreens.com/WHOMST.

Our show art was created by Torrence Browne, and our audio is produced by Graham Cook. For bios and transcripts, check out our website at podandprejudice.com. Pod and Prejudice is transcribed by speechdocs.com. To support the show, check out our Patreon!

Instagram: @podandprejudice

Twitter: @podandprejudice

Facebook: Pod and Prejudice

Youtube: Pod and Prejudice

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Today, we're discussing the hooplah chapters (6-8). Harriet sits for her portrait, we get our first proposal, and Emma and Knightley go head to head. Topics discussed include Emma the Instagram boyfriend, cross stitching, the class dynamics of Emma and Harriet's relationship, the meaning of "natural daughter," and Elton's prospects.

Study Questions: Topics discussed include what we've learned about our three men, Knightley and Emma's argument, being team Robbiet, Knightley's evaluation of Harriet, the narration of the story, and what we think of Emma.

Funniest Quote: “It is very pretty,” said Mr. Woodhouse. “So prettily done! Just as your drawings always are, my dear. I do not know any body who draws so well as you do. The only thing I do not thoroughly like is, that she seems to be sitting out of doors, with only a little shawl over her shoulders—and it makes one think she must catch cold.”

Questions Moving Forward: Are Knightley and Emma in a fight? Will Mr. Martin try again? Who does Elton like? Does Harriet like Elton?

Who Wins the Chapters? Mr. Knightley

Glossary of Terms and Phrases:

canvassing (v): question (someone) in order to ascertain their opinion.

cockade (n): a rosette or knot of ribbons worn in a hat as a badge of office or party, or as part of a livery.

Glossary of People, Places, and Things: Never Have I Ever, Portrait of a Lady on Fire, It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia, Gilmore Girls, Avatar: The Last Airbender

Next Episode: Chapters 9-10

Pod and Prejudice is sponsored by Athletic Greens. To get a full year's supply of Vitamin D AND 5 free travel packs with your first purchase of AG1, head on over to athleticgreens.com/WHOMST.

Our show art was created by Torrence Browne, and our audio is produced by Graham Cook. For bios and transcripts, check out our website at podandprejudice.com. Pod and Prejudice is transcribed by speechdocs.com. To support the show, check out our Patreon!

Instagram: @podandprejudice

Twitter: @podandprejudice

Facebook: Pod and Prejudice

Youtube: Pod and Prejudice

Merch store: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/pod-and-prejudice?ref_id=23216


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In today's episode, we chat about chapters 4 and 5 of Emma. We learn more about Harriet and the Martins, Emma sees a potential match, and we hear Knightley and Mrs. Weston's opinions about Emma. Topics discussed include Harriet's CROOSH, Emma's classism, reading habits, and attractiveness.

Study Questions: Topics discussed include the Economics of Friendship in Jane Austen, Robert Martin's thirst for Harriet, Emma's response to said thirst, Knightley's perception of Emma, our opinions on Mr. Elton, and Emma's marriage prospects.

What do we think of Emma? She's a snob.

Funniest Quote: “Oh! you would rather talk of her person than her mind, would you? Very well; I shall not attempt to deny Emma’s being pretty.”

Questions Moving Forward: What are the Westons' designs for Emma? Who is Mr. Elton?

Who wins the chapters? Mr. Knightley

Glossary of Terms and Phrases:

fastidious (adj.): very attentive to and concerned about accuracy and detail

thot (slang): that hoe over there

Glossary of People, Places, and Things: Parks and Recreation, Abbott Elementary, Into the Woods, Luke Danes

Next Episode: Chapters 6-8

Pod and Prejudice is sponsored by Athletic Greens. To get a full year's supply of Vitamin D AND 5 free travel packs with your first purchase of AG1, head on over to athleticgreens.com/WHOMST.

Our show art was created by Torrence Browne, and our audio is produced by Graham Cook. For bios and transcripts, check out our website at podandprejudice.com. Pod and Prejudice is transcribed by speechdocs.com. To support the show, check out our Patreon!

Instagram: @podandprejudice

Twitter: @podandprejudice

Facebook: Pod and Prejudice

Youtube: Pod and Prejudice

Merch store: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/pod-and-prejudice?ref_id=23216

1
New

Simply Write w/ Polly Campbell

from Polly Cambell | Electracast
14
Most recent episode: Jan 23, 2023 07:00 PM
Last Checked: Within the last few hours
Language: en Explicit: no Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: Have you always dreamed of writing? Of becoming a published author? Then you are in the right place, because in this podcast Simply Write, veteran magazine writer and author, Polly Campbell offers the kind of practical, behind-the-screens information and inspiration that will help you shape a writing career. Well go deep into writing technique, mindset, markets, pitches, and the other details youll need to publish your work and we will talk to bestselling authors about how they get their work done and published and how you can do it too. Join us every Monday when we talk about the craft of writing and the quirks of creating a writers life. And consider joining the Simply Write community by becoming a subscriber at simplywrite.substack.com where youll have access to exclusive material and bonus content.

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Freakonomics Radio
Each week, Freakonomics Radio tells you things you always thought you knew (but didn’t) and things you never thought you wanted to know (but do).
#Documentary #Society & Culture
14 Episodes
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Simply Write w/ Polly Campbell


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Wendi Aarons, author of I'm Wearing Tunics Now, Ginger Mancino Kid Comedian is here to talk about crafting comedy and the serious side of writing humor. Wendi Aarons: https://www.wendiaarons.com/ Join our https://SimplyWrite.substack.com for writing tip sheets, essays, and info to help you publish your work and create a writer's career and life. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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Openings, ledes, beginnings, whatever you call them they better be compelling and hook your reader. In today's episode, we talk about some ways to do it and Polly goes off on one her favorites for the In the Desk segments. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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Screenwriter, consultant, and novelist Wendall Thomas, author of Foged Off, and other Cyd Redondo novels, talks about optioning scripts, writing comic novels, and managing multiple projects. Find Wendall Thomas at https://www.wendallthomas.com/ Join the Simply Write community at https://simplywrite.substack.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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Create your own editorial calendar to track ideas, markets, deadlines, and publishing opportunities. The process also fires up creativity and helps you publish more. Listen to learn why. Plus they can be fun to make. https://SimplyWrite.substack.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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The end of the year is a good time to make sure you have a healthy business infrastructure, one that supports the writing work you want to do. In this episode we talk about some of the people and processes that can help you create a health shop, so you can publish more. Questions, comments, ideas? Become a part of our Simply Writer subscriber community https://SimplyWrite.substack.com Follow Polly on Instagram @PollyLCampbell Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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Learn about what content marketing writing is and how you can cultivate clients and develop a lucrative career from Jennifer GoForth Gregory, author of The Freelance Content Marketing Writer. Join our substack and SimplyWrite.substack.com Find Jennifer at www.jennifergregorywriter.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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The clearer you are about what your story is about, the clearer your writing will be and that's good for you and the readers. Assignment: Hone your focus. Want feedback? Join the Simply Write community as a paid subscriber and leave a comment with your thoughts and questions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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She was flat on her back in the hospital room and started working on the idea that became her first published picture book Every Other Christmas. Author Katie Otey talks about her process, juggling projects, and why it's important to tell your story. Jjoin the Simply Write community for more from Katie Otey about why she created a publishing company and the first point of entry for picture books. https://simplywrite.substack.com/ Find Katie at www.katieoteywrites.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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Writers have no shortage of ideas, but how do you decide which idea to develop into a publishable piece? It's not enough to follow your curiosity, you must also consider form, timeliness, focus, and other elements before you ever start writing. This episode covers the things to consider before you ever start writing. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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Agatha-award-winning author Lori Rader-Days shares her writing process, explains when she knew it was time to quit her office job (bad boss), and how she deals with self-doubt (craft books), and much more. If you love to talk writing and aspire to write a novel, this show with authors Polly Campbell and Lori-Rader day is for you. Check out Death at Greenway (loved it) and her other books here: www.Loriraderday.com Get bonus material, other writing info, and discounted access to upcoming writer's workshops by becoming a paid subscriber at www.simplywrite.substack.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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New

Salt & Spine

from Brian Hogan Stewart
159
Avg Episode Length: 42 min
Most recent episode: Jan 23, 2023 06:06 PM
Last Checked: Within the last few hours
Language: en Explicit: No Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: We tell the compelling stories behind cookbooks you wont get anywhere else. Featuring interviews with leading authors, we explore the art and craft of cookbooks, looking at both new and vintage cookbooks and the inspirations behind them … the compelling people who create them … and their impact on home cooks and the culinary world.

saltandspine.substack.com

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Episode 153: Uliks Fehmiu

Uliks Fehmiu is a co-founder of the beloved bakery Pain D’Avignon, which sprang up on Cape Cod over three decades ago. But the story of the bakery begins back in Uliks’ childhood and his early friendships in war-torn Belgrade.

What Uliks calls an “improbable journey into baking” is shared, for the first time in this format, with his recent cookbook: The Pain d'Avignon Baking Book: A War, An Unlikely Bakery, and a Master Class in Bread. The book offers an in-person account of Uliks’ and his co-founders’ stories—brought to life with striking illustrations. Here’s more:

In a journey that started in Belgrade amid the beginnings of war, and continued in America, four friends tested this philosophy to the extreme: They began a new life and opened a tiny bakery together on Cape Cod. Working hectic, twenty-four-hour days, while living all together in a loft above their business and making it all up as they went along, the founders of Pain D'Avignon quickly became one of the first highly acclaimed purveyors of artisanal bread in the Northeast.

The book also features 60 recipes spanning from Pain d’Avignon’s chef-loved loaves of sourdough and Cranberry Pecan bread to croissants, sandwiches, sweets, and more.

Uliks joined us remotely in our virtual studio for this Baking Month episode. I hope you enjoy our chat!

Featured Recipes from The Pain d’Avignon Baking Book:

This week, paid subscribers can access two featured recipes from Uliks Fehmiu’s The Pain d’Avignon Baking Book: an Apple Tart and the bakery’s Blueberry Lemon Scones.

Salt + Spine is supported by listeners like you. To get full access to our exclusive content and featured recipes, and support our work, consider becoming a paid subscriber.



This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit saltandspine.substack.com/subscribe

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Episode 152: Maya-Camille Broussard

Maya-Camille is the creative force behind Justice of the Pies, her Chicago bakery that’s become known for inventive and unmatched flavors (Lemon Espresso Pie … Blue Cheese Praline Pear Pie … and so on).

Much of Maya-Camille’s work traces back to her roots, with a significant influence from her father, the self-dubbed “Pie Master,” who worked as a criminal defense attorney by day. As with many family stories, Maya-Camille’s is complex and dotted with both adoration and strife. A strong sense of social activism and community building runs through her blood, though, and is baked into her work.

Her first cookbook, also titled Justice of the Pies, brings these beloved and revered recipes to home bakers with 85 recipes for both sweet and savory pies—plus quiches, tarts, whoopie pies, and more.

“I've always loved baking,” Maya-Camille says in our chat. “But at my core, I am a creative individual. And also at my core, I love working with my hands. I do have an arts background in terms of dancing, in terms of theater, in terms of visual art. I even played upright bass for five years. But culinary is still an art form—and it's the only art form that we have that's required for us to live. I don't dance as much anymore, but I'm still living, you know? I don't paint anymore, but I'm still living. If I don't eat, I'm not gonna live. So I can take this creative energy that I have and pour it into something that also provides me sustenance.”

Justice of the Pies is also filled with stories of “stewards" who Maya-Camille says are “agents of change who stand for fairness and equality.” Maya-Camille penned short profiles and developed recipes to honor folks like Black Joy Project creator Kleaver Cruz; cookbook author and Equity at the Table founder Julia Turshen and Design*Sponge founder Grace Bonney; and disability rights activist Claudia Gordon. (Or take Big Kika Keith and Kika Jr., who opened LA’s first Black-owned, women-led dispensary. To accompany their story, Maya-Camille developed a “Peaches and Herb Cobbler” that features a weed-infused butter.)

P.S. Maya-Camille starred in Netflix’s “Bake Squad” hosted by Christina Tosi, and she returns to the cast for a second season with it drops later this month.

Featured Recipes from Justice of the Pies

This week, paid subscribers can access two featured recipes from Maya-Camille’s Justice of the Pies: Lavender Whoopie Pies and Chocolate-Peanut Butter + Pretzel Tart.

Salt + Spine is supported by listeners like you. To get full access to our exclusive content and featured recipes, and support our work, consider becoming a paid subscriber.



This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit saltandspine.substack.com/subscribe

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Hi there, today we’re excited to release the fifth episode in our 2022 Baking Month. Thanks for your patience, as our team was under the weather! Today’s guest is Brian Noyes, whose latest cookbook is The Red Truck Bakery Farmhouse Cookbook. For all of December, we’ll be celebrating some of the year’s best baking books with a handful of author interviews, dozens of featured recipes, excerpts, and more. Read on!

* Do you love Salt + Spine? We’d love if you shared this email with a friend who might want to #TalkCookbooks with us, too:

Episode 151: Brian Noyes

Next in our Baking Month series, Brian Noyes joins us to #TalkCookbooks!

Brian is the founder of Red Truck Bakery, the rural Virginia spot that’s become a national attraction and drawn the praise of everyone from Oprah Winfrey to Barack Obama.

During a career in art direction at major media outlets in Washington, DC, Brian began spending his weekends baking pies and other goods. Before long, he’d purchased an old red pickup truck (from Tommy Hilfiger, no less) and was selling out of his sweet treats. Two locations and two cookbooks later, Red Truck Bakery continues—and Brian’s latest cookbook, The Red Truck Bakery Farmhouse Cookbook is out now and goes beyond sweets to include rustic, savory fare.

Bonus Content + Recipes This Week

This week, paid subscribers have access to two recipes from Brian’s book: Orange Pecan Rolls and Virginia Peanut Pie as well as other bonus Baking Month content:

Find the Red Truck Bakery Farmhouse Cookbook recipes here:

* Orange Pecan Rolls

* Virginia Peanut Pie

More Salt + Spine Baking Month!

Stay tuned to our Substack through the end of the month for exclusive recipes and more featured conversations with baking authors.



This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit saltandspine.substack.com/subscribe

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Hi there, today we’re excited to release the fourth episode in our 2022 Baking Month. Today’s guest is Laurel Kratochvila, whose debut cookbook, New European Baking, is out now. For all of December, we’ll be celebrating some of the year’s best baking books with a handful of author interviews, dozens of featured recipes, excerpts, and more. Read on!

* Do you love Salt + Spine? We’d love if you shared this email with a friend who might want to #TalkCookbooks with us, too:

Episode 150: Laurel Kratochvila

Next in our Baking Month series, Laurel Kratochvila joins us to #TalkCookbooks!

Born in Boston, Laurel left her hometown for Katmandu after graduating with a degree in Physics from Tufts. She wound up in Prague, working in a bookstore and café, where she also met her husband.

It wasn’t until the duo decided to open up a bookstore in Berlin’s Prenzlauer Berg that Laurel started baking professionally—and her delicious bagels and baked goods were a hit. But Germany loves its paperwork, so Laurel decided to head to France to get a formal education in pastry.

The long-standing traditions of baking in Europe inspired her first cookbook: New European Baking: 99 Recipes for Breads, Brioches, and Pastries. The book features not only classic pastry recipes and step-by-step instructions for complicated breads and pastry, but it also profiles a dozen bakers across Europe who represent what Laurel sees as the “new” baking that’s taking off in Europe. Working off a basis of strong tradition, female bakers are leading the way to a thoughtful approach to baking.

Now, Laurel’s café, Fine Bagels, and her husband’s bookstore, Shakespeare & Sons, are both running smoothly, and Laurel reports that Berliners have come to love the English-language bookshop and New York-style bagels.

Bonus Content + Recipes This Week

This week, paid subscribers have access to two recipes from Laurel’s book: Halva Flan and Potato, Thyme, and Gruyère Hand Pies as well as other bonus Baking Month content:

Find the New European Baking recipes here:

* Halva Flan

* Potato, Thyme, and Gruyère Hand Pies

More Salt + Spine Baking Month!

Stay tuned to our Substack over the next two weeks for exclusive recipes and more featured conversations with baking authors.



This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit saltandspine.substack.com/subscribe

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Hi there, today we’re excited to release the third episode in our 2022 Baking Month. Today’s guest is Erin Jeanne McDowell, whose latest cookbook, Savory Baking, is out now. For all of December, we’ll be celebrating some of the year’s best baking books with a handful of author interviews, dozens of featured recipes, excerpts, and more. Read on!

* Do you love Salt + Spine? We’d love if you shared this email with a friend who might want to #TalkCookbooks with us, too:

Episode 149: Erin Jeanne McDowell

Next in our Baking Month series, Erin Jeanne McDowell joins us to #TalkCookbooks!

A Midwest native, Erin learned to bake like so many of us: alongside her grandmothers. While studying Baking & Pastry Arts at the Culinary Institute of America, Erin was drawn to a career in food media.

After years of working alongside other cookbook authors and for food media outlets, Erin published her first solo cookbook, The Fearless Baker, in 2017, to high praise. Her pie book, aptly titled The Book on Pie, soon followed.

And now we’re treated to her latest cookbook—the one she tells us she’s been mulling on for years: Savory Baking: Recipes for Breakfast, Dinner, and Everything in Between. From breads to hearty tarts and other savory bakes (yes, that includes pizza!), Savory Baking brings the joy of baking to those of us with a “salt tooth” more than a sweet tooth. (Don’t worry — there are some sweet spins, too.)

Bonus Content + Recipes This Week

Paid subscribers have access to two featured recipes from Savory Baking: Enchilada Pie and the Flakiest Cheese Biscuits.

Find the Savory Baking recipes here:

* Enchilada Pie

* Flakiest Cheese Biscuits

More Salt + Spine Baking Month!

Stay tuned to our Substack over the next two weeks for exclusive recipes from Benjamina Ebuehi’s The New Way to Cake and more featured conversations with baking authors.

Salt + Spine is supported by listeners like you. To get full access to our exclusive content and featured recipes, and support our work, consider becoming a paid subscriber.



This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit saltandspine.substack.com/subscribe

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Hi there, today we’re excited to release the second episode in our 2022 Baking Month. Today’s guest is Brian Levy, whose sugar-free baking book, Good & Sweet, is out now. For all of December, we’ll be celebrating some of the year’s best baking books with a handful of author interviews, dozens of featured recipes, excerpts, and more. Read on!

* Do you love Salt + Spine? We’d love if you shared this email with a friend who might want to #TalkCookbooks with us, too:

Episode 148: Brian Levy

Next in our Baking Month series, Brian Levy joins us to #TalkCookbooks!

Brian’s interest in cooking and gastronomy began in high school when he went on a month-long trip to France. He discovered Gourmet magazine and started watching Martha Stewart, The Two Fat Ladies, and more food TV.

Before he began his career in pastry, Brian studied journalism and was determined to work for Gourmet. To build up his resume, he thought some experience in the kitchen might help—so he went back to France where he interned in a bistro outside of Paris. Eventually, he made his way to New York where he interned at Michelin-starred Babbo before later studying architecture at Yale.

Brian’s first cookbook, Good and Sweet: A New Way to Bake with Naturally Sweet Ingredients, has been called a “game-changing collection of desserts” by celebrated author and baker Alice Medrich.

In the book, Brian eschews processed sugar and common substitutes like maple syrup, opting instead to let pure fruits and other whole ingredients naturally sweeten and enliven his recipes.

Bonus Content + Recipes This Week

This week, paid subscribers will receive three featured recipes from Good & Sweet: Rosemary-Lemon Shortbread, a Pistachio-Studded Peach Galette, and the Perfect Currant Scone.

Find the recipes here:

* Rosemary-Lemon Shortbread

* Pistachio-Studded Peach Galette

* Perfect Currant Scone

More Salt + Spine Baking Month!

ICYMI, yesterday we featured recipes from Chetna's Easy Baking: Simple Cakes with a Twist of Spice by Chetna Makan:

* Spicy Coriander Chicken Bake

* Banoffee Chocolate Pavlova

And stay tuned to our Substack this week for exclusive recipes from Benjamina Ebuehi’s The New Way to Cake and a featured conversation with Erin Jeanne McDowell.

Salt + Spine is supported by listeners like you. To get full access to our exclusive content and featured recipes, and support our work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber.



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It’s our annual Baking Month, and we’re kicking things off with some return guests! Back on the show today are Rose Levy Beranbaum and her collaborator-turned-hubby Woody Wolston. They’re joining Brian in-studio to talk about their latest work, The Cookie Bible.

Episode 147: Rose Levy Beranbaum

Rose likely needs no introduction to those in the cookbook world. But here’s what you need to know:

* She published the ground-breaking The Cake Bible in 1988, changing how many home and professional bakers approached the craft. (In particular, Rose helped lead the charge to include the more accurate weight measurements in her recipes instead of just volume.)

* The Cake Bible is now in its 60th printing (!!!), and Rose shares some news on what’s next for the classic work.

* In that time, Rose has penned a dozen other cookbooks, from The Baking Bible to The Bread Bible—and other non-bible titles on ice cream, cakes, Christmas cookies, and more.

* Rose’s latest cookbook, The Cookie Bible, completes her “quartet of bibles” on cake, pie, bread, and, now, cookies. The book includes every type of cookie you could imagine—from macarons to rolled-and-cut holiday cookies, to sandwich cookies and cookie bars.

In this first episode of Baking Month, Rose and Woody join us to discuss the book-making process, their newly minted marriage, and play a cookie-themed game.

Two Recipes from The Cookie Bible

To celebrate the launch of Baking Month, today’s first recipe for Lemon Lumpies is available to all Substack subscribers for a limited time!

A second recipe from The Cookie Bible for Chocolate Truffle Cookies is available for paid subscribers.

* Do you love Salt + Spine? We’d love it if you shared this email with a friend who might want to #TalkCookbooks with us, too:

Still to Come in Baking Month

Our Baking Month line-up is packed with all-star authors from this year’s top baking books. Hear new podcast interviews with guests like Claire Saffitz and Maya-Camille Broussard. Become a paid subscriber to Salt + Spine today to get access to dozens of featured Baking Month recipes.

Here’s a peek at our full line-up:

Salt + Spine is supported by listeners like you. To get full access to our exclusive content and featured recipes, and support our work, consider becoming a paid subscriber.

Stay tuned to our Substack tomorrow for exclusive recipes from Chetna's Easy Baking: Simple Cakes with a Twist of Spice by Chetna Makan.



This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit saltandspine.substack.com/subscribe

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Hi there, exciting show for you this week. Melissa Clark, one of the most prolific cookbook writers of the modern era, joins us. Read on!

* Do you love Salt + Spine? We’d love if you shared this email with a friend who might want to #TalkCookbooks with us, too:

Episode 146: Melissa Clark

This week, Melissa Clark joins us to #TalkCookbooks!

When we launched Salt + Spine, I wrote a short list of our dream guests — the cookbook authors who, at the time, I felt were pushing the industry in new directions or had a wealth of experience to learn from. We’ve been lucky to sit down with many folks from that list (from Samin Nosrat to Julia Turshen to Vivian Howard…). Today, we’re marking one more off that list as Melissa joins us in-studio to discuss her latest cookbook, Dinner in One.

Dubbed the “gold standard for Internet recipe writing” by Eater, Melissa Clark has been developing recipes for over a decade at The New York Times, where she started with a short sidebar on home cooking questions before joining as a columnist and reporter. (A recent search on NYT Cooking showed her byline attached to some 1,391 results!)

That early NYT series Melissa authored, called “Food Chain,” offered helpful tips and answers to cooking challenges in the era before such information was one keystroke away. Today, her NYT column, “A Good Appetite,” features everything from a reinvented crab dip to her best Instant Pot recipes.

And all the while, Melissa’s written 45 cookbooks! She’s collaborated on books with chefs like Daniel Boulud, David Bouley, and Claudia Fleming. Her 2017 home-cooking tome, Dinner: Changing the Game, features more than 200 recipes for inventive, interesting meals. She’s following it up with her latest work, Dinner in One, which features recipes that use just “one” vessel—one sauté pan, one sheet tray, one pot, etc.

In this week’s show, we’re talking with Melissa about growing up with food-loving parents who immersed her in French food and culture at an early age … how she landed at the NYT, even though she turned down their first job offer … and how dining out is critical to her recipe development process. And, of course, we’re putting her to the test in our signature culinary game.

Bonus Content + Recipes This Week

This week, paid subscribers will receive two featured recipes from Melissa's Dinner in One: the Roasted Cauliflower and Potatoes with Harissa, Yogurt, and Toasted Almonds and her Ricotta Olive Oil Pound Cake.

Salt + Spine is supported by listeners like you. To get full access to our exclusive content and featured recipes, and support our work, consider becoming a paid subscriber.

Coming Up…

* Attention Bay Area fans: Our fifth-annual Cookie Swap is coming up on Sunday, Dec. 11 featuring oodles of cookies and demos from yours truly, Kristina Cho, and more! The cookie swap is sold out, but you can join the waitlist here!

* This week’s episode with Melissa Clark is the last “regular” episode of the year—but we’ve got something really exciting in store for December. Stay tuned for more details!



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Hi there! After a short break last week, we’re back with new episodes and bonus content for subscribers. This week, cookbook author Odette Williams joined us in our studio at The Civic Kitchen in San Francisco to talk pasta.

* Do you love Salt + Spine? We’d love if you shared this email with a friend who might want to #TalkCookbooks with us, too:

Episode 145: Odette Williams

This week, Odette Williams joins us on Salt + Spine to #TalkCookbooks!

Odette was an actor long before she started calling herself a cook (or an author). She called Sydney home until 2006 and credits the unpretentious, adventurous attitude of Australia for her own approach to cooking.

Leaving Sydney for love, Odette joined her now-husband in New York and started a family. As she was spending more time cooking with her children, she was inspired to design high-quality aprons just for kids. (The aprons were a hit and sold by goop, J. Crew, and Anthropologie; Odette jokes that she quickly became the “apron lady.”)

While Odette’s career as a food writer grew (her new Wall Street Journal column, Party Trick, makes entertaining easy), those aprons also ended up in the hands of a couple of editors at the cookbook publishing house Ten Speed Press—and, well, the cookbook cards fell into place.

Heavily influenced by the food writing of prolific cookbook author Donna Hay and the recipes she found in the monthly Australian Women's Weekly magazine, Odette’s recipes are clear, concise, and simply delicious.

Odette’s first cookbook, Simple Cake, featured recipes for basic cakes that could be customized and combined in a number of different ways.

And now, Odette’s back with her second cookbook: Simple Pasta. In a similar vein to Simple Cake, this book provides some building blocks—dough recipes, and a few sauces—that can be customized to your mood. But the book explodes with dozens of creative recipes from cocktails to starters to salads. And of course, lots of pasta.

There are classics—cacio e pepe and carbonara and so on. But the seasonally divided book also offers recipes like Peppery Pappardelle, Pancetta & Mushrooms … Sweet Corn & Jalapeno Ravioli … to a Luxe Mac & Cheese that Odette says is “bordering on hedonistic.” The emphasis here is fresh pasta—which Odette says you can and should make!—though notes indicate where store-bought dried pasta can stand in.

We’ve got a great episode for you today: In today’s show, we’re talking with Odette about how she settled into this career, about the success of her “Simple” books, and why pasta is sometimes better for serving 2 than 20. And of course, we’re putting her to the test in our signature culinary game.

Bonus Content + Recipes This Week

This week, paid subscribers will receive:

* Two recipes from Simple Pasta: the Garganelli with Vodka Sauce and the Winter Chicories with Date and Anchovy Dressing. Yum:

* An exclusive author-read except: Hear Odette read her love letter to pasta from Simple Pasta!

* The next installment of our bookseller Q&A: This week, Bonnie Slotnick joins us. (Fun fact: She started by selling books at Kitchen Arts & Letters!)

Salt + Spine is supported by listeners like you. To get full access to our exclusive content and featured recipes, and support our work, consider becoming a paid subscriber.

This Week’s New Cookbook Releases

Here are a few of the new cookbooks on shelves this week:

* Smitten Kitchen Keepers: New Classics for Your Forever Files by Deb Perelman

* Tasty Total Comfort: Cozy Recipes with a Modern Touch: An Official Tasty Cookbook

* Baking Bread with Kids: Trusty Recipes for Magical Homemade Bread by Jennifer Latham

* Avocadomania: Everything about Avocados from Aztec Delicacy to Superfood: Recipes, Skincare, Lore, & More by Déborah Holtz & Juan Carlos Mena

* The Anchor Brewing Story: America's First Craft Brewery & San Francisco's Original Anchor Steam Beer by David Burkhart

* Cocktail Time!: The Ultimate Guide to Grown-Up Fun by Paul Feig

* The Pastry Chef Handbook: La Patisserie de Reference by Pierre Paul Zeiher and Jean Michel Truchelut

* Steve the Bartender's Cocktail Guide by Steven Roennfeldt

* Eat Plants, B*tch: 91 Vegan Recipes That Will Blow Your Meat-Loving Mind by Pinky Cole

* Seattle Cocktails: An Elegant Collection of Over 100 Recipes Inspired by the Emerald City by Neil Ratliff

🍪 COOKIE SWAP WITH US!

Attention Bay Area fans: Our fifth-annual Cookie Swap is coming up on Sunday, Dec. 11 — and we can’t wait to see you there! Reserve your spot here and find more details below.

Join us for a fun-packed event featuring loads of cookies to admire and sample (some made by you!, if you like), baking and decorating demos, and glasses of sparkling wine or warm apple cider.

You’re invited to wander about our kitchen, tasting cookies made by The Civic Kitchen team and cookbook authors featured on Salt+Spine. Learn baking tips from our live demos, including by Salt+Spine host Brian Hogan Stewart, a surprise Cookbook Author (or 2), and a bevy of Civic Kitchen teachers.

Throughout it all, we’ll swap cookies with new and old friends. Bring one dozen (or more) homemade cookies and trade them for another mixed dozen to take home. No time to bake? You can still take away cookies for $10 per dozen.

We will have some exciting giveaways, including baking books, Salt+Spine t-shirts and more! Proceeds from the event benefit La Cocina, supporting their talented Bay Area food entrepreneurs.

If you love cookies or cookbooks (or both), you do not want to miss this event!



This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit saltandspine.substack.com/subscribe

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Hi there! It’s Election Day in America, so we’re bringing you a special episode today that’s all about baking with a political and emotional spin. If you haven’t voted yet, find your polling place here. If you’ve already voted, it’s always a good time to donate to organizations like the ACLU or Color of Change to protect our voting and civil rights.

* Do you love Salt + Spine? We’d love if you shared this email with a friend who might want to #TalkCookbooks with us, too:

Episode 144: Becca Rea-Tucker

This week, Becca Rea-Tucker joins us to #TalkCookbooks.

Becca is the creator of the popular Instagram, @thesweetfeminist, where she became known for creating visually striking cakes and other baked goods with political and empowering messages. Check out a few:

After living in Washington, DC, and working at the beloved Baked & Wired bakery, Becca decided to merge the frustration and anger she was feeling living in the capital during the previous administration with something she was great at: writing on cakes.

The book deal came next, and Becca decided to focus on a new aspect of baking: the therapeutic benefits. Baking by Feel brings together 65 recipes with related emotions—if you’re feeling awkward, she suggests the Kitchen Sink Cookies; in optimistic moments, turn to her Cardamom Caramel Poke Cake. There are recipes in all five major mood groups, from happy to sad to angry (pounding out graham crackers for a crust, anyone?).

We’ve got a great episode today — Becca joins us to talk about baking as an act of resistance, of self-care, and of tapping into whatever you’re feeling today (or tomorrow).

This Week’s Recipes

Paid subscribers this week will get access to two of Becca’s recipes from Baking by Feel: the Black Pepper Snowballs (if you’re feeling vengeful) and the Chocolate Espresso Shortbread (if you’re feeling bitter). Yum!

Get all our bonus content—and our full archive of hundreds of exclusive recipes—by becoming a paid subscriber today:

Listeners like you support Salt + Spine. To get full access to our exclusive content and featured recipes, and support our work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber.

This Week’s New Cookbook Releases

Here are a few of the new cookbooks on shelves this week:

* What's for Dessert: Simple Recipes for Dessert People by Claire Saffitz

* The Perfect Loaf: The Craft and Science of Sourdough Breads, Sweets, and More by Maurizio Leo

* Noma 2.0: Vegetable, Forest, Ocean by René Redzepi

* The Big Texas Cookbook: Food That Defines the Lone Star State by Texas Monthly Editors

* Cook As You Are: Recipes for Real Life, Hungry Cooks, and Messy Kitchens by Ruby Tandoh

* Conversations Behind the Kitchen Door: 50 American Chefs Chart Tomorrow's Food Culture by Emmanuel Laroche

* Eat, Drink, and Be Murray: A Feast of Family Fun and Favorites by Andy Murray

* Where the River Narrows: Classic French & Nostalgic Québécois Recipes from St. Lawrence Restaurant by J-C Poirier

* Chinese-ish: Home Cooking Not Quite Authentic, 100% Delicious by Rosheen Kaul and Joanna Hu

* Big Has HOME: Recipes from North London to North Cyprus by Hasan Semay

And we were off last week, so here’s last week’s new releases, too:

* Pasta Grannies: Comfort Cooking: Traditional Family Recipes From Italy’s Best Home Cooks by Vicky Bennison

* The Woks of Life: Recipes to Know and Love from a Chinese American Family by Bill, Kaitlin, Judy & Sarah Leung

* (Serious) New Cook: Recipes, Tips, and Techniques by Leah Su Quiroga and Cammie Kim Lin

* Chicano Bakes: Recipes for Mexican Pan Dulce, Tamales, and My Favorite Desserts by Esteban Castillo

* Very Good Salads: Middle-Eastern Salads and Plates for Sharing by Shuki Rosenboim and Louisa Allan

* All About Cookies: A Milk Bar Baking Book by Christina Tosi

* Baking Imperfect by Lottie Bedlow

* Free Spirit Cocktails: 40 Nonalcoholic Drink Recipes by Camille Wilson

* Midcentury Cocktails: History, Lore, and Recipes from America's Atomic Age by Cecelia Tichi

* The Best American Food Writing 2022 by Sohla El-Waylly



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Write-minded: Weekly Inspiration for Writers

from Brooke Warner and Grant Faulkner (NaNoWriMo)
84
Avg Episode Length: 36 min
Most recent episode: Jan 23, 2023 12:00 PM
Last Checked: Within the last few hours
Language: en-US Explicit: no Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: Write-minded: Weekly Inspiration for Writers is currently in its fourth year. We are a weekly podcast for writers craving a unique blend of inspiration and real talk about the ups and downs of the writing life. Hosted by Brooke Warner of She Writes and Grant Faulkner of National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo), each theme-focused episode of Write-minded features an interview with a writer, author, or publishing industry professional. This year we’re featuring a Book Trend at the end of each episode to keep listeners in the loop about what they need to know about the book industry. Brooke and Grant bring to this weekly podcast their shared spirit of community, collaboration, and a deeply held belief that everyone is a writer, and everyone’s story matters.

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Write-minded: Weekly Inspiration for Writers


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This week’s episode focuses in on our favorite hard topic—inclusion in book publishing. But this conversation is not just a run-of-the-mill conversation about DEI, which we acknowledge can and has gotten a bit diluted in recent months. Instead it’s a fresh and inspiring conversation about what inclusion really means in book publishing, and we interview an inspiring publisher, Rebekah “Bex” Borucki, who is doing the hard work of creating true change in publishing by creating a publishing company that is focused on inclusivity in all the parts of the business and the business model. Geek out on publishing with us this week, but also be prepared to learn and be inspired by what Row House publishing is doing, and the woman who’s leading the charge. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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This week’s episode is a celebration of discipline with author Adriana Trigiani, who says that the creative expression is the highest expression of our souls. As such, discipline is honoring the gift. We delve into what Adriana learned about working as a writer for the show, A Different World, and her take on the vast changes in the publishing world from her vantage point as a veteran author of more than twenty books. An insightful show that celebrates working hard! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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Should we be worried about the current state of reading? It’s hard to answer no to this question. Which is why Grant and Brooke take up the topic this week with guest Andrew Limbong, host of NPR's Book of the Day podcast. Tune in to set a reading goal with Grant, commiserate with Brooke about the kids’ reading habits these days, and hear some great book recommendations from a guest who’s more on top of the book scene than most. We also talk about the reading brain vs. Internet brain, and throw in a little neuroscience for good measure. Join us! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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Happy New Year! This short show to ring in the new year starts with a confession from Brooke about Write-minded’s annual New Year’s show —this is Number 5! Grant and Brooke share updates on current writing projects (including goals), episodes that rose to the top in 2022, and one creative takeaway from our writing lives. We invite you to reflect and get reinspired along with us as we forge ahead into a bright new year! And we hope you’ll check out Brooke’s class, 5 Things I’ve Learned about What It Takes to Get Published, coming up on February 19. Find the details at: https://myfivethings.com/class/brooke-warner-what-it-takes-to-get-published. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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This week’s episode is an upbeat and fun look at marketing with guest Dave Chesson, who’s on the cutting edge of Amazon and other book marketing strategies. We cover Amazon rankings, marketing ideas for fiction writers (who too often get left out of these conversations), and why to share your personal story out in the world. This episode includes concrete types and explains some things about Amazon that often feel elusive, so it’s worth your time even if your next published book is a ways out there on the horizon. Oh—and happy holidays. We’re off next week so Write-minded will be back in your queue on January 2! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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Aya de León returns to Write-minded to share an announcement about her new climate fiction imprint, Fighting Chance Books, that she’s launching in partnership with She Writes Press in 2023. This is an inspiring conversation about why a climate fiction literature of winning is so important. Aya makes the case that the future isn’t written yet—and we need more stories in which humanity fights back and wins in order to create a different narrative than the dystopian stories that currently dominate CliFi. An important conversation—with a mission at its core. Please help us spread the word about Fighting Chance Books! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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An episode that covers so much—the power of writing what’s essential; an exploration of two kinds of abysses: total noise and total silence; and a forthcoming recounting of what it’s like to be on the receiving end of problematic reviews. Guest Sarah Manguso has been called a virtuoso, and her takes on the literary world and writing in her compelling, spare style remind us why we love a meaty interview. Brooke and Grant revel in Sarah’s responses and candor this week—and know listeners will too. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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This is an episode that will validate every creative impulse you’ve ever had and forgive any creative lapses you might be judging yourself for. Join Grant and Brooke in this inspiring episode with Angie Cruz, who’s faced rejection and overcame it to become a celebrated published author, and who shares with us how she’s in conversation with her characters, pursues other creative interests as a way to inform her fiction, and how she’s balanced her writing with the many other demands of life. A relatable and permission-giving episode! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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Olga Dies Dreaming is guest Xochitl Gonzalez’s new novel—and how you interpret it might tell you something about your political persuasion. This week we are exploring what it means to be radical in fiction—especially when what you’re trying to be radical about is packaged as a fast-paced story. This is the subversive (meant in the best sense of the word) nature of fiction with a cause—which we explore this week in all its nuanced glory. Adelante! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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This week, guest David Yoon joins us in a conversation that takes on often-fraught topics with humor and candor. We talk about why YA is such fertile ground for representative stories about race, culture, and identity, and David’s mission to bring more visibility to writers of color. We talk about his approach to writing and how he writes not for or to a particular genre, but to sort out the questions he’s grappling with—something so many writers will relate to. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Writing Excuses

from Brandon Sanderson, Mary Robinette Kowal, Dan Wells, and Howard Tayler
80
Avg Episode Length: 20 min
Most recent episode: Jan 22, 2023 11:00 PM
Last Checked: Within the last hour
Language: en-US Explicit: clean Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: Brandon Sanderson, Mary Robinette Kowal, Howard Tayler, and Daniel Wells discuss writing techniques in a fast-paced, 15-minute format.

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Sydnee in the Sheets
We get into love, dating, relationships, friendships, and sex. I’m all about helping you find ways to feel good and positive, in and out of the bedroom.
#Health & Fitness
80 Episodes
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Writing Excuses


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Your Hosts: Mary Robinette Kowal, DongWon Song, Erin Roberts, Dan Wells, and Howard Tayler In this episode Erin Roberts very enthusiastically launches our interview with "OG" Dan Wells with a delightfully difficult question, paraphrased thusly: "is there advice you gave back in the early days that you still stand by today?" There are lots of other questions, including one about bacon! Credits: This episode was recorded by Marshall Carr, Jr., and mastered by Alex Jackson

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Your Hosts: Mary Robinette Kowal, DongWon Song, Erin Roberts, Dan Wells, and Howard Tayler As we announced in the first episode of the year (and in this press release),  DongWon Song and Erin Roberts are joining us as permanent cast members. Today we're conducting an interview with Erin Roberts. She is newer to career writing than any of the rest of us, but her contributions to Writing Excuses have already been invaluable.  In this episode we'll learn a bit more about why, and about what Erin will bring to the program going forward. Credits: This episode was recorded by Marshall Carr, Jr., and mastered by Alex Jackson

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Your Hosts: Mary Robinette Kowal, DongWon Song, Erin Roberts, Dan Wells, and Howard Tayler As we announced in last week's episode (and in this press release),  DongWon Song and Erin Roberts are joining us as permanent cast members. In this episode we conduct an interview with DongWon Song, plumbing a few depths, and learning a bit more about what he can teach all of us. Liner Notes: DongWon Song's newsletter, Publishing is Hard, can be found at publishingishard.com. It's free, but paid subscriptions are available. Credits: This episode was recorded by Marshall Carr, Jr., and mastered by Alex Jackson

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Your Hosts: Mary Robinette Kowal, DongWon Song, Erin Roberts, Dan Wells, and Howard Tayler We begin 2023 with some big changes, and in this episode we'll discuss those, starting with some changes to the core cast. DongWon Song and Erin Roberts are joining us as permanent cast members, and Brandon Sanderson is stepping aside with "emeritus" status. But the episode isn't just announcements. We each talk about where we are career-wise, what we're working on, and what we're excited to bring to the podcast this year. Credits: This episode was recorded by Marshall Carr, Jr., and mastered by Alex Jackson  

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Your Hosts: Brandon, Dan, Mary Robinette, and Howard This Q&A session was recorded before a live audience aboard ship at WXR 2022, Here are some paraphrasings of the questions our attendees asked: How do you make your world feel big without infodumping? How do you balance a sense of progress with an unreliable narrator? How can I make two magic systems work in the same setting when one is underpowered, and the protagonist uses the weaker one? Have you ever based characters on yourself, or on people you know? What does the process of book adaptation look like Do you have any good convention recommendations? What are some methods for determining how much scientific detail you go into? How do you interact with an audience in order to grow it? Credits: This episode was recorded by Marshall Carr, Jr., and mastered by Alex Jackson.

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Your Hosts: Dongwon Song, Piper J. Drake, Peng Shepherd, Marshall Carr, Jr., and Erin Roberts Let's talk about burnout. It's been a long few years (with some of those years feeling like decades) so this may seem timely, but burnout can happen during otherwise ordinary times. Ignoring it or simply trying to "burn smarter, not harder" can have serious repercussions. In this episode we talk about why we burn out, how we recognize it, how we deal with it, and how we (eventually) recover from it. Credits: This episode was recorded by Matthew Drake, and mastered by Alex Jackson.

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Your Hosts: Howard Tayler, Dongwon Song, and Dan Wells Thanks to some last-minute schedule changes, we almost didn't have an episode for today. Only three cast members were able to make it to the session, and none of those three had the syllabus. But we forged ahead anyway, and recorded an episode about why we felt it was important to record an episode. That may sound like one too many layers of meta, but just wait until we add the layers in which this actually applies to writing! Liner Notes: Dongwon's newsletter is called "Publishing is Hard." Dan's newsletter doesn't have a name, but can be signed up for here. Credits: This episode was recorded by Marshall Carr, Jr., and mastered by Alex Jackson.

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Your Hosts: Mary Robinette, C.L. Polk, Fran Wilde, and Howard Tayler  Let's put a stake in the ground here: disabilities do not grant magical powers. And yet that exact trope can be found in multiple genres, across multiple mediums. In this episode we talk about why this happens, and how we might better portray the magical awesomeness found in our bodies. Credits: This episode was recorded by Daniel Thompson, and mastered by Alex Jackson.

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Your Hosts: Mary Robinette, C.L. Polk, Fran Wilde, and Howard Tayler  Let's talk about pain. It hurts, yes, but we all experience it, so writing about it can be a great point of connection between the writer and the reader. Also, writing about it can hurt. Liner Notes: We referenced  "No, I'm Fine," by Howard Tayler, and "The Visions Take Their Toll: Disability and the Cost of Magic," by Dominic Parisien Credits: This episode was recorded by Daniel Thompson, and mastered by Alex Jackson.

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Your Hosts: Mary Robinette, C.L. Polk, Fran Wilde, and Howard Tayler  This is the "talking about how to talk about" talk. We begin by reviewing the difference between the medical model and the social model of disability. Liner Notes: This TikTok provides a nice explanation of the medical and social models of disability. There's also this essay, "The Linguistics of Disability" over at Fireside Fiction. Credits: This episode was recorded by Daniel Thompson, and mastered by Alex Jackson.
1
New

Velocity of Content

from Velocity of Content
129
Avg Episode Length: 17 min
Most recent episode: Jan 22, 2023 05:00 PM
Last Checked: Within the last few hours
Language: en-US Explicit: clean Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: The Velocity of Content podcast is produced by CCC, the global leader in content workflow and rights integration with 40+ years of experience providing solutions and copyright education for businesses and publishers. Featuring breaking news and thoughtful analysis from across the dynamic global content industry, CCC’s Velocity of Content is a platform for thought leaders and industry experts operating at the speed of content to share new ideas, observations, and knowledge and stay on top of emerging industry trends and challenges.

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09-01-2022 "One of my favorite podcasts. Very informative."
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129 Episodes
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Velocity of Content


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CourthouseThe US and other countries should consider developing innovative AI policies and intellectual property laws, says Prof. Ryan Abbott.

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New York City SkylineIPA President Karine Pansa urged Digital Book World publishing industry attendees to make more books more accessible to more people.

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Karine PansaA special focus for Karine Pansa and IPA is to encourage members to increase accessibility in their works. Currently, just 10% of published content is accessible to print-disabled readers.

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Girl Reading EbookOverDrive, a digital distributor of eBooks, audiobooks, and streaming video titles for public libraries, has reported on its performance last year.

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The ThinkerSure, you’ve been told what to think many times. You could even say that’s what the internet is for. Now comes Tom Chatfield with a paradigm twist. The author and digital philosopher offers us advice for how to think.

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Falling MoneyMedian compensation for all respondents was $72,500 in 2021, up from $67,300 in 2020.

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Student Reading EbookThe trick to making ebooks accessible and even beautiful is to think of them as software, says Jens Tröger, Bookalope founder.

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Ukrainian Flag Surrounded by Dark CloudsMachines that can read aloud would be considered magic in any other era, yet in 2022, such technology is unremarkable and will soon be commonplace. Whether we read silently in a quiet library or listen to an audiobook while commuting on a crowded train, the written word continues to hold us in its spell.

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ClassroomFrom enumeration of animal species living in every corner of the globe to identification of fossil remains of ancient creatures, scientific inquiry looks from the present day into the very dimmest past. Science can’t see into the future – not yet anyway. The responsibility to make the future a place that is welcome, inclusive, and full of understanding lies with all of us.

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2022 - The year In BooksFor December 16, the final show of the year, CCC’s podcast highlights the biggest stories in the book world for 2022.
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Ghostreaders Podcast

from Quintell Allen
33
Avg Episode Length: 27 min
Most recent episode: Jan 22, 2023 02:06 PM
Last Checked: Within the last few hours
Language: en Explicit: clean Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: Husband & Wife, Michae and Quintell discuss audiobook narration and their lives as lovers, parents and business owners. They specialize in working with Black authors and bringing soul to their words.

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Ghostreaders Podcast


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  • Way too much time talking about the pronunciation of the number 20
  • Our 2023 goals
  • Say Alexa too loud and she appears!!
  • Youversion bible app allows you to choose your narrator
  • Michae doesn’t like to share the kitchen with the kids
  • Our 2022 accomplishments
  • Quintell’s observations from listening to the show
  • Be sure to check out blogs about the shows on www.ghostreaders.com on the podcast tab
  • Pick up our gear at thewritestuffmerch.com
  • Being nice vs. being a people pleaser
  • Letting go of things that hurt you
  • Backup cameras
  • Driving in South Florida
  • Christmas pajamas

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This is our Christmas Show! On this episode, Michae & Quintell talk about- Christmas Shopping- Children & Fairness- Nothing in Alanis Morrissette’s song was ironic- The Challenge of buying gifts for kids - Emotionally preparing for children’s behavior - The power of thought and forethought - Gauntlet, retro video game - The power of specialization - Check us out on Fountain.fm- Is listening to an audiobook really reading - Reviews of: Finding Me by Viola Davis - Confessions of an Economic Hitman by John Perkins - The War on Drugs by David Farber - Michae answers the question, ‘What about Chicago?’ - Quintell doesn’t like the saying ‘soup to nuts’ - Audiobooks, like film, need a director - What are we watching: Flash - Quintell hates time travel as much as she hates zombies - You can actually earn bitcoin for listening to our show at Fountain.fm - The camera work on The Handmaid’s Tale - Film and tv that’s slow, until it isn’t

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On this episode, Michae & Quintell talk about: - Reading a book a week- Trash books- A great narrator can be an additional round of edits- All books aren’t equal, some are just money grabs- Favorite languages- When do compliments get weird?- They talk about feet for way too long- Flip flops or flip flaps?- Poorly executed colloquialisms- The Giant Slide- Is podcast editing ‘dishonest’- Favorite apples- Nigeria kicking out non Nigerian advertising- Church as colonization

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In this episode Michae & Quintell talk about a little bit of everything!- Rap dates don’t work after 1999- Wutang may or may not be forever but audiobooks definitely are!- Michae needs to do more podcast show prep…next time- Also, Michae lied, he neither called the #, nor went to the website- Michae has his own ‘wait’ music (its not good)- Quintell tells an uncle joke (aunt joke?)- Do you monitor what your kids read like you monitor what they watch or listen to?- Is YA for ‘kids’?- The genius of Judy Blume- Gospel music and its massive blind spot- My kids know how to sing ‘Let it Go’ backwards. Not sure if that’s a parenting fail or win- My kids are Seinfeld fans from listening to his audiobook (who knew?)- Review of Will Smith’s biography ‘Will’- What we are reading: Quintell, The Spiritual Life of a Leader; Michae, When Affirmative Action was White and he just wrapped up, The Color of Law- Racism is much more than a personal thing, its a policy thing- Bootstraps can’t beat laws and policies- The genius of Lovecraft Country- Reading short books twice- Dade County has a specific sound/accent- A doing philosophy- Why we avoid reading ratchet stuffSubscribe so you don't miss an episode!

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Today Quintell and Michae talk about:- How come Quintell won’t do video- Facebook knows you don’t have the rights to the music, telling them means nothing…- Genius in one area doesn’t make you an expert at everything- Check out Total Domination by: Marritta Gillcrease- Old school board games, like Operation and…- Why do kindergarten teachers talk to everyone like they talk to their students?- Why is it scary to work with little kids?- Quintell is on a journey with Jimmy Fallon- You gotta know your mic!!!!- Michae almost gets in trouble with Dave Anderson The Business Bully- Michae has an evil villain laugh

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We are wrapping up this season and next year we will be back with video podcasts. We will still have audio on this platform but you can see our lovely faces on YouTube!Check out John Hargrave’s books on Crypto, they’re great!People don’t let lack of quality scare them from putting their work out there…Excellence is irrelevant if you’re on the sidelinesNew season of Star Trek Discovery is out!!!Its difficult to do work, even when its work you want to do. Well, getting the work started is the hard partThe Sun makes things difficult…Tips for starting a podcast- Plan your shows as far in advance as possible- Have fun and be honest- A treated space is better than high end gear- Know how to use your gear- Good editing does wonders for your show- Stay away from copyright music in your show- Be unique and stay in your lanePeople like a hero’s journeyFirehouse’s cherry limeade is amazing!!!What happened to KFC?Olive Garden, issa no for usFirehouse or Publix? Leave a commentA meatball sub is not a real subGreatness is built on top of failureMichae is going to do standup next yearHamilton referenceEvery business should have a commercialSee y'all next year!!

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Ep 23In this episode, Michae and Quintell cover:- PG today is not the same PG from when we were kids- F bomb quota and rules- Our Marvel film double standard- The latest Mortal Kombat film- Excellence vs. overdoing- Knowing when to do less- Michae bores Quintell talking about stock options- Cornbread dressing innovation- We hear commercials differently now- Working rituals- Drying Clothes

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In this episode the Ghostreaders discuss:- Creating commercials- Washing vs. Shampoo- Quintell’s dance choreography skills- Streamlining work- Getting it right ‘in camera’ vs. ‘fixing it in post’- Ghostreaders on Clubhouse- Tarballs- When your professional skill set jumps into your personal life- The 'Newscaster' sound- Quintell was on the news team in elementary school- The whole last 2 minutes is shameless self promotion

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We’ve been absent from these podcast streets for a while! Today Michae & Quintell talk about:- Why we haven’t done a show in a while- Their business structure- Ways to keep our children quiet- Excitement about being empty nesters from 9am - 2pm- Having multiple kids vs. 1 kid- The real reason why we even have a podcast- You should have a podcast too!!- We have a thing for Nicolas Cage- Video is on the way!!!- Quintell is reading ‘Medical Apartheid’- Michae is reading ‘How Not to Be Wrong’- Warning! Michae & Quintell talk about gum for about 7 -8 minutes (an unreasonably long period of time to be discussing gum and the talk about something else and then circle back to gum!!!!) Its really only 5 minutes but that’s still too long - …and they sing the Big Red theme song- We promise to have a show for y’all weekly- Plans for the show going forward- One last gum story before we go- How many pieces of small gum make up a normal sized piece of gum?- Vintage gum

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After watching This is Us, Michae and Quintell talk about parenting and life as a parent, hiring movers and dessert.
1

Interesting People Reading Poetry

from Stermer Brothers
28
Most recent episode: Jan 16, 2023 01:14 PM
Last Checked: Within the last few hours
Language: en-US Explicit: yes Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: Interesting People Reading Poetry is a short, sound-rich podcast where artists and luminaries read a favorite poem and share what it means to them. Created by Andy & Brendan Stermer.

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Cloud Wars Live with Bob Evans
In Cloud Wars Live, Bob Evans talks with Cloud vendors and customers about profoundly transformative cloud technologies.
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28 Episodes
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Interesting People Reading Poetry


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In this episode, Alissa Rubin reads an excerpt from the ancient Greek epic The Iliad. Rubin is a Senior International Correspondent for The New York Times. She worked previously as the Bureau Chief in Baghdad, Paris, and Kabul. In 2016, she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in International Reporting for "thoroughly reported and movingly written accounts giving voice to Afghan women who were forced to endure unspeakable cruelties." https://open.spotify.com/episode/7obE0bUZiGyAzOr7e6iI5x The passage that Rubin selected is from the very last book of The Iliad, and portrays an encounter between the Trojan King Priam and the Greek warrior Achilles. If you’re unfamiliar with the story, all you really need to know — for our purposes — is that Priam’s son killed Achilles’ best friend in combat, and Achilles then killed Priam’s son in retribution. At the point where we meet them, Achilles has been dragging the body of his slain enemy behind his chariot for twelve days, and Priam has come in person to his enemy's encampment to plead for the return of his son’s body.  The Iliad by Homer, translated by Robert Fagles, is published by Penguin Random House. Alissa Rubin's reporting – including her recent must-read coverage on climate change in the Middle East – is available to subscribers of The New York Times. We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. Subscribe on RadioPublic, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher.

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In this episode, Makoto Fujimura reads an excerpt from “Burnt Norton” by T. S. Eliot. Fujimura is a leading contemporary painter whose work fuses abstract expressionism with traditional Japanese painting styles. He is also the author of several books, including Art + Faith: A Theology of Making, out now from Yale University Press. https://open.spotify.com/episode/22qWbZwSKOZFHnuq7jxzb2 T. S. Eliot was an influential modernist poet, playwright, and literary critic born in St. Louis in 1888. His late masterpiece, Four Quartets, is a collection of four linked poems partially inspired, in sound and structure, by Beethoven’s late string quartets. “Burnt Norton,” the first poem in the series, was written while Eliot was living in England in 1935. “Burnt Norton” by T. S. Eliot appears in Four Quartets, published by Ecco. Art + Faith: A Theology of Making by Makoto Fujimura is available now from Yale University Press. Keep up with Fujiumura – and explore his recent visual art – on his website, Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. Subscribe on RadioPublic, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher.

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In this episode, Theo Padnos reads “The Drunken Boat” by Arthur Rimbaud. Padnos is an American writer and journalist. In 2012, he was kidnapped and held captive for two years by an Al Qaeda affiliate in Syria. His new book about the experience, Blindfold: A Memoir of Capture, Torture, and Enlightenment, was described in the Atlantic as "the best of the genre, profound, poetic, and sowerful." https://open.spotify.com/episode/0E57BTo2FI63XOPVyjsqrZ Arthur Rimbaud was a French symbolist poet born in 1854. He composed “The Drunken Boat” when he was just 16 years old, and stopped writing poetry altogether in his early twenties. "The Drunken Boat" by Arthur Rimbaud, translated by Wallace Fowlie, appears in Rimbaud: Complete Works, Selected Letters, published by University of Chicago Press. Blindfold: A Memoir of Capture, Torture, and Enlightenment by Theo Padnos is available now from Simon & Schuster. To learn more about Theo's story, we also recommend the documentary Theo Who Lived directed by David Schisgall. We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. Subscribe on RadioPublic, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher.

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In this episode, Hrishikesh Hirway reads "The Lake Isle of Innisfree" by William Butler Yeats. Hirway is the creator and host of several acclaimed podcasts, including Home Cooking (with Samin Nosrat), The West Wing Weekly (with Joshua Malina), and Song Exploder (which is now also a Netflix original series). On top of all that, Hirway manages a career as a composer and recording artist. At the beginning of this interview, you'll hear a short clip from his new single, "Between There and Here (feat. Yo-Yo Ma)." https://open.spotify.com/episode/7pu2x8Z3tA2Qzgl058WhGd "The Lake Isle of Innisfree" by William Butler Yeats was written in 1888 and included in his second collection, The Rose, published in 1893. You can likely find an assortment of Yeats' books at your local independent bookstore. Keep up with Hrishikesh Hirway on Twitter, Instagram, and at hrishikesh.co. Click here to stream, download, or watch the music video for "Between There and Here (feat. Yo-Yo Ma)." Click here to explore all of Hirway's many wonderful ongoing projects. We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. Subscribe on RadioPublic, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher. This episode uses the sound "Banter Boys" by Nickleus from freesound, licensed under CC BY 3.0.

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In this episode, Bon Appétit Editor-in-Chief Dawn Davis reads “Sonnet 171” by Edna St. Vincent Millay. Davis joined Bon Appétit in November 2020 following a long career in book publishing. Through her visionary work at Simon & Schuster and HarperCollins, Davis oversaw the publication of numerous influential best sellers — from “The Pursuit of Happyness” by Chris Gardner to “The Known World” by Edward P. Jones.  https://open.spotify.com/episode/4Ckf6fySDPqisv9vNzygx4 Edna St. Vincent Millay was an American poet born in 1892. She became wildly popular during her lifetime — known for her passionate readings and bold social views — and achieved a special mastery over the sonnet.   “Sonnet 171” by Edna St. Vincent Millay appears in the volume Collected Poems, published by Harper Perennial Modern Classics.  Keep up with Dawn Davis on Instagram, and at bonappetit.com.  We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. Subscribe on RadioPublic, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher.

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In this episode, Grian Chatten reads “The Windhover” by Gerard Manley Hopkins. Chatten is the frontman of the Irish post-punk band Fontaines D.C., recently described by NME as "the new heroes of the rock resurrection." The members of the group met while attending music college in Dublin and initially bonded over a shared love for Irish literature. Their second album, A Hero's Death, has been nominated for a 2021 Grammy Award for Best Rock Album. https://open.spotify.com/episode/31tSGmqny6OPHQ1YWagJmV Gerard Manley Hopkins was an English poet and Jesuit priest who spent the last years of his life as a professor of Greek and Latin at University College Dublin. His poems were not published until 30 years after his death in 1889.“The Windhover” by Gerard Manley Hopkins appears in Gerard Manley Hopkins: The Major Works, published by Oxford University Press. Keep up with Fontaines D.C. on Twitter, Instagram, and at fontainesdc.com. Click here to watch the music video for "Big," the song heard briefly at the beginning of this episode. We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. Subscribe on RadioPublic, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher.

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In this episode, Alec Soth reads "Of Modern Poetry" by Wallace Stevens. Soth is a photographer based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He has published over twenty-five books and has been called a "living legend" and "one of the most important photographers working today" by the Washington Post. https://open.spotify.com/episode/6U9XgyQuamdVdEDw1P9ZNm Soth's recent photo book, I Know How Furiously Your Heart is Beating, is a stunning collection of portraits and interiors from around the world. Soth has described the collection as an attempt to "strip the [photographic] medium down to it's primary elements." The collection takes its title from an early poem by the American modernist Wallace Stevens, whose meditations on poetry and aesthetics have helped shape Soth's understanding of his own work."Of Modern Poetry" by Wallace Stevens appears in The Collected Poems of Wallace Stevens, published by Vintage. Keep up with Alec Soth on Instagram and at alecsoth.com. His new collaborative book with C. Fausto Cabrera is available here for preorder. We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. Subscribe on RadioPublic, iTunes, Spotify, or Stitcher.

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In this episode, Sheryl Paul reads from "Song of Myself" by Walt Whitman. Paul is a counselor working in the tradition of Jungian depth psychology. She runs the popular blog and website, Conscious Transitions, and is the author, most recently, of The Wisdom of Anxiety: How Worry & Intrusive Thoughts Are Gifts to Help You Heal. Paul writes of anxiety not as a disorder to be eradicated, but as a wise messenger from the unconscious and an invitation to self-trust. https://open.spotify.com/episode/7cA213gsdEmnLNIK724wMy A key companion on Paul’s own journey to self-trust has been the legendary American poet Walt Whitman. His 52-part epic, "Song of Myself", first published in the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass, is among the most beloved and influential poems in the American tradition. Keep up with Sheryl Paul on Instagram, Facebook, and at conscious-transitions.com. We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. Subscribe on RadioPublic, iTunes, Spotify, or Stitcher.

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In this episode, Jennifer Crandall reads "Keeping Things Whole" by Mark Strand. Crandall is a documentary filmmaker and journalist. She is the creator, most recently, of Whitman, Alabama – a must-watch web series in which Alabama residents recite passages from Walt Whitman's poem, "Song of Myself." Crandall has described the project as "an experiment in using documentary and poetry to reveal the threads that tie us together — as people, as states, and as a nation." https://open.spotify.com/episode/5jO5ZJao4NZy4Peus2OrJh “Keeping Things Whole” by Mark Strand appears in the volume, Collected Poems, published by Alfred A Knopf. Keep up with Jennifer Crandall on Twitter and at jenncrandall.com. We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. Subscribe on RadioPublic, iTunes, Spotify, or Stitcher.

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In this episode, Robert Alter reads from his translation of the Song of Songs. Alter is a literary critic and translator based at the University of California, Berkeley. In 2018, he published a landmark, one-man translation of the entire Hebrew Bible – the culmination of over two decades of scholarship. https://open.spotify.com/episode/30aHgozRmfI887FcizwpPe The Song of Songs – sometimes referred to as the Song of Solomon – is a book of the Hebrew Bible, typically dated to the 4th century BCE. The Song of Songs, 4:8 – 5:1, translated by Robert Alter, appears in The Hebrew Bible: A Translation with Commentary published W.W. Norton & Company. We feature one short listener contribution at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read something after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. Subscribe on RadioPublic, iTunes, Spotify, or Stitcher.
1

The New Yorker: Fiction

from WNYC Studios and The New Yorker
190
Avg Episode Length: 46 min
Most recent episode: Jan 01, 2023 12:00 PM
Last Checked: Within the last hour
Language: en-us Explicit: no Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: A monthly reading and conversation with the New Yorker fiction editor Deborah Treisman.

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The New Yorker: Fiction


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Gary Shteyngart joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Omakase,” by Weike Wang, which was published in *The New Yorker* in 2018. Shteyngart is the author of five novels including, most recently, “Lake Success” and “Our Country Friends.” 


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Ling Ma joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Seeing Ershadi,” by Nicole Krauss, which was published in The New Yorker in 2018. Ma is the author of the novel “Severance” and the story collection “Bliss Montage,” which came out in September.


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Jamil Jan Kochai joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “All Will Be Well,” by Yiyun Li, which was published in The New Yorker in 2019. Kochai is the author of two books, the novel “99 Nights in Logar,” which was a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award, and the story collection “The Haunting of Hajji Hotak,” which is a finalist for the National Book Award. He is currently a Hodder Fellow at Princeton.


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Madeleine Thien joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “The Cafeteria in the Evening and a Pool in the Rain,” by Yoko Ogawa, translated from the Japanese by Stephen Snyder, which was published in The New Yorker in 2004. Thien’s books include the novels “Dogs at the Perimeter” and “Do Not Say We Have Nothing,” which won the Governor General’s Literary Award and the Scotiabank Giller Prize. 


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Elif Batuman joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Truth and Fiction,” by Sylvia Townsend Warner, which was published in The New Yorker in 1961. Batuman is the author of one book of nonfiction, “The Possessed: Adventures with Russian Books and the People Who Read Them,” and two novels, “The Idiot” and “Either/Or,” which was published earlier this year. She has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 2010.


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André Alexis joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Waiting for Death in a Hotel,” by Italo Calvino, translated, from the Italian, by Martin McLaughlin, which was published in The New Yorker in 2006. Alexis’s novels include “Childhood,” “Days by Moonlight,” and “Fifteen Dogs,” which won the Scotiabank Giller Prize in 2015.

2022 © Italo Calvino, performed with permission of The Wylie Agency LLC.


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Akhil Sharma joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Zombie,” by Joyce Carol Oates, which was published in The New Yorker in 1994. Sharma is the author of the novels “Family Life” and “An Obedient Father,” which will be reissued in a revised version this month.


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Rachel Kushner joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Come Into the Drawing Room, Doris,” by Edna O’Brien, which was published in The New Yorker in 1962. Kushner is the author of three novels and most recently the essay collection “The Hard Crowd,” which was published last year.


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Camille Bordas joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “A Father-to-Be,” by Saul Bellow, which was published in The New Yorker in 1955. Bordas’s novel “How to Behave in a Crowd,” was published in 2017


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Sherman Alexie joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Where I’m Calling From,” by Raymond Carver, which was published in The New Yorker in 1982. Alexie is the author of nineteen books of fiction and poetry, including “Blasphemy: New and Selected Stories” and the novel “Flight.”

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57
Most recent episode: Dec 27, 2022 03:00 PM
Last Checked: Earlier today
Language: en Explicit: true Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: Bringing hope to the world through Speculative Fiction. Interviews with Science Fiction and Fantasy writers, gamers, creators, and activists.

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57 Episodes
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If This Goes On (Don't Panic)


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In this live episode, Alan interviews one and only Charlie Stross. They discuss the Laundry Files, Corporations as AIs, politics, and much more.

Charlie's Twitter: @cstross

Mastadon: wandering.shop/@cstross

Blog: http://www.antipope.org/charlie/

If you'd like to support us you can give us a one time donation at Kofi or you can subscribe to our Patreon.


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In this live episode, Alan interviews up-and-coming poet and writer Jess Cho. They discuss the importance of speculative poetry, the need for a better poetry community, Alan's controversial poetry career, and Jess' aspirations.

If you'd like to support us you can give us a one time donation at Kofi or you can subscribe to our Patreon.


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In this episode, Alan and Cat chat with law professor and author Rebecca Giblin and author, activist, and journalist Cory Doctorow about monopsony, how creators can fight back against the controlling corporations, Harlan Ellison, and their new book Chokepoint Capitalism.

If you'd like to support us you can give us a one time donation at Kofi or you can subscribe to our Patreon.


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In this episode, Alan and Cat chat with author, Zig Zag Claybourne, about writing joy, creating a unique voice, Alan Moore, the X-Men, and Star Trek.

If you'd like to support us you can give us a one time donation at Kofi or you can subscribe to our Patreon.


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In our 4th audio column about publishing in Africa we chat with Oghenechovwe Donald Ekpeki about his experience at World Con 80 (also known as ChiCon). We discuss his travel difficulties, how he felt about being nominated, and his hopes for future World Cons.


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In this live episode, Alan interviews the legendary editor Ellen Datlow. They discuss how William Gibson was discovered, hope in horror, her influence on science fiction and horror, among other topics.

If you'd like to support us you can give us a one time donation at Kofi or you can subscribe to our Patreon.


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In this live episode, Alan interviews the award winning editor and interviewer Arley Sorg. They discuss the future of Fantasy Magazine, the magazine's mission, and interviewing science fiction and fantasy authors.

If you'd like to support us you can give us a one time donation at Kofi or you can subscribe to our Patreon.


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Episode 30. In this episode, Alan and Diane chat with author and journalist, Sim Kern, about their new collection, space billionaires, and writing good characters.

If you'd like to support us you can give us a one time donation at Kofi or you can subscribe to our Patreon.

 

 


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In this live episode, Alan interviews the Hugo nominated creators of the Hugo, Girl podcast. They discuss their favorite bad Hugo winners, how they develop the podcast, and how they feel about the nomination.

1

Cookery by the Book

from Suzy Chase
284
Avg Episode Length: 0 min
Most recent episode: Dec 12, 2022 01:30 PM
Last Checked: Within the last few hours
Language: en Explicit: no Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast:

Cookery by the Book is a podcast for cookbook lovers. Join host, Suzy Chase, as she chats with cookbook authors to discover interesting stories behind your favorite cookbooks.

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Premiere
The Last Saturday Night
Gigi shares tales of her friends and family as they deal with living under the pandemic lockdown.
#Fiction #Comedy Fiction #Drama #Society & Culture
284 Episodes
1 to 10 showing (most recent first)


Cookery by the Book


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1

Story Grid Writing Podcast

from Shawn Coyne and Tim Grahl
283
Avg Episode Length: 48 min
Most recent episode: Nov 03, 2022 08:00 AM
Last Checked: Earlier today
Language: en-us Explicit: yes Podcast Style: episodic
About this podcast: Helping you become a better writer.

Join Shawn Coyne, author of Story Grid and a top editor for 30+ years, and Tim Grahl, struggling writer, as they discuss the ins and outs of what makes a story great.

More at www.StoryGrid.com.

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08-26-2022 no comment
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283 Episodes
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Story Grid Writing Podcast


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We're down to line edits on Tim's iteration of the masterwork Eye Witness by Ed McBain.

Shawn, Danielle, and Leslie provide final feedback on how to clean up the last few error messages still coming through.

 

Click here to read Tim's scene: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Yma-xAE77UnQMNAjTyOUPxF21P_DaFxuNXyQin-0gHo/edit?usp=sharing

To see the transcript of this episode, visit: https://storygrid.com/episode-283

Get a free copy of our book Story Grid 101: The First Five Principles of the Story Grid Methodology: https://storygrid101.com

This is Episode 283 of the Story Grid Podcast: https://storygrid.com/podcast


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Now that Tim has had a breakthrough on his iteration of EYE WITNESS by Ed McBain, we're getting down to fixing individual Beats and checking to make sure he's adhered to the Story Grid 624 Analysis.

You really see the Story Grid Tools shine in this episode as Leslie and Danielle apply them to Tim's writing to find places still left to fix.

 

Click here to read Tim's scene: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1b-RzszE7YzLEn5fSlWAqVQ_OkXhuJg3cxfZImXzIkYI/edit?usp=sharing

To see the transcript of this episode, visit: https://storygrid.com/episode-282

Get a free copy of our book Story Grid 101: The First Five Principles of the Story Grid Methodology: https://storygrid101.com

This is Episode 282 of the Story Grid Podcast: https://storygrid.com/podcast


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Does Tim Actually Get It Right? How to Nail the Narrative Device

On Tim's 10th draft, he finally makes a breakthrough on his iteration of EYE WITNESS by Ed McBain!

And it ended up being a simple practice that got him over the hump.

Listen in as Shawn, Danielle, Leslie, and Tim discuss how to nail the narrative device.

 

Click here to read Tim's scene: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1RRmqjv90vYpi20B7kbxgdHQwdhFRvB3pESZD6Y52XEg/edit?usp=sharing

To see the transcript of this episode, visit: https://storygrid.com/episode-281

Get a free copy of our book Story Grid 101: The First Five Principles of the Story Grid Methodology: https://storygrid101.com

This is Episode 281 of the Story Grid Podcast: https://storygrid.com/podcast


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In this impromptu episode, Tim and Danielle discuss the ongoing problems with the work on the Ed McBain EYE WITNESS scene and why Tim can't connect with his characters.

 


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Shawn takes a crack at rewriting Tim's scene to help him understand what he's missing on the Narrative Device.

Then we hear Leslie and Danielle's edits and feedback on what he got right and wrong.

When they ask Tim what he thinks of all this, lots of emotions start coming out including his feeling that he's not writing anymore... he's pretending to write.

 

Click here to read Tim's scene: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1QZGyUNetvNGfKAjwyfF3m4r9RPoMQN4g3Q18oWXoLOw/edit?usp=sharing

To see the transcript of this episode, visit: https://storygrid.com/episode-279

Get a free copy of our book Story Grid 101: The First Five Principles of the Story Grid Methodology: https://storygrid101.com

This is Episode 279 of the Story Grid Podcast: https://storygrid.com/podcast


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There are lots of insights in this week's episode of the podcast.

We look at the emotional connection between the hero and victim, ensuring there is conflict at every level of the story, and how better to lock in to the narrative device.

Click here to read Tim's scene: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1V6ja3HN4uKuS0J4x6pvWBUwkZUiE5uJov5jM3Gj-Yvw/edit?usp=sharing

To see the transcript of this episode, visit: https://storygrid.com/episode-278

Get a free copy of our book Story Grid 101: The First Five Principles of the Story Grid Methodology: https://storygrid101.com

This is Episode 278 of the Story Grid Podcast: https://storygrid.com/podcast


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Nobody is innocent in your story. Everyone is hiding something.

You must adjust these levels correctly in order for your reader to connect with the right characters.

This is the focus Danielle, Leslie, and Shawn take on Tim's scene this week.

Click here to read Tim's scene: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1M_rP2ARaDQbSlGBmNRESszzYuNN-nrxa0pdJjt0qQRU/edit?usp=sharing

To see the transcript of this episode, visit: https://storygrid.com/episode-277

Get a free copy of our book Story Grid 101: The First Five Principles of the Story Grid Methodology: https://storygrid101.com

This is Episode 277 of the Story Grid Podcast: https://storygrid.com/podcast


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Who is the Hero, Victim, and Perpetrator in your story?

What are the relationships between each of them?

The more vague or ungrounded each of these relationships are, the more the story will not read as believable.

This is the focus Danielle, Leslie, and Shawn take on Tim's scene this week.

Click here to read Tim's scene: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1OQd5NxTcn2JLwrphueCX91A4wXN9BEQFBYwbyN7NJ1M/edit?usp=sharing

To see the transcript of this episode, visit: https://storygrid.com/episode-275

Get a free copy of our book Story Grid 101: The First Five Principles of the Story Grid Methodology: https://storygrid101.com

This is Episode 275 of the Story Grid Podcast: https://storygrid.com/podcast


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Figuring out your Story Theme is the key to unlocking the entire roadmap of your story.

Scott Mann is the author of the new book → Operation Pineapple Express: The Incredible Story of a Group of Americans Who Undertook One Last Mission and Honored a Promise in Afghanistan.

Randall Surles is a Story Grid Certified Editor and worked with Scott to develop and produce the book under an extremely tight deadline.

In this interview, they discuss what went into writing the book, how they worked together, and what it meant to write a book like this.


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How do you ground your characters in a reality that your reader will believe even though you are making the whole thing up?

This week Tim makes the mistake of sterilizing his protagonist to the point where he is no longer interesting or believable. Shawn, Danielle, and Leslie walk him through the steps of using character development and a strong narrative device to fix these problems.

Click here to read Tim's scene: https://docs.google.com/document/d/10bdr_tF4ASohz0cHoNjlbNmsLOVXiDpFw54ugHYLZI8/edit?usp=sharing

To see the transcript of this episode, visit: https://storygrid.com/episode-274

Get a free copy of our book Story Grid 101: The First Five Principles of the Story Grid Methodology: https://storygrid101.com

This is Episode 274 of the Story Grid Podcast: https://storygrid.com/podcast

1

The Hansel and Gretel Code

from Curtis Cates, MD
27
Avg Episode Length: 38 min
Most recent episode: Oct 19, 2022 09:00 AM
Last Checked: Jan 25, 2023 11:06 AM
Language: en Explicit: yes Podcast Style: serial
About this podcast: Hansel and Gretel may seem like a simple fairy tale, but the real meaning hidden between its lines has nothing to do with any simplistic moral of the story...

like a real-life Da Vinci Code — Hansel and Gretel is a literary and cultural treasure map filled with secret clues meant only for people like us to follow...

clues that will lead us to a meaningful, real-life treasure thats been lost for over 200 years...

along the way, well discover that the real villains of the story are still with us, and theyre not only people youve only heard of — some of them are people you actually know...

this is the podcast for people who love fairytales, and whod love to find out what they really mean...

in the Hansel and Gretel Code, well be reading from the 1810 manuscript version of the story and well be examining the many, multi-faceted clues that are packed into each of its 42 sentences...

each of those clues will not only entertain the hell out of you, theyre going to change the way you see the world and everyone in it...

come on this trip through Hansel and Gretels forest with me and I guarantee youre going to learn how to read fairytale clues like this for yourself...

and not only that — the treasure were going to find will be the key to our very own happily ever after...

so if youre game, follow the Hansel and Gretel Code on whatever app floats your boat and then visit the website https://betweenthelines.xyz/hgcode-podcast for links, transcripts and plenty of extra surprises along the way...

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27 Episodes
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The Hansel and Gretel Code


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In E. 26 we stick our noses deeper into the magical darkness of Hermeticism, get deeper insight into the Emerald Tablet, and find a new connection between Hansel's Moon rocks and Hermes Trismegistus: in Sweden

Part 1 [11:15] - In which we fall asleep while reading the Emerald Tablet, and find ourselves dreaming about some furry cousin of Rocky the Flying Squirrel

Part 2 [21:23] - In which we read what some Wikipedia editors have to say about Hermeticism, and then we do some alternate thinking for ourselves

Part 3 [32:38] - In which we get on the Time Machine and take a little trip to look for the real Hermes Trismegistus — in Sweden?

*transcripts and links for each episode are available at: betweenthelines.xyz

*Chapter Titles read by Anna Jacobsen*

*Music and Sound credits for this episode (26) are SUPER-extensive and can be found on the website @ betweenthelines.xyz

with special thanks to freesound.org for nearly all of kristo's awesome peanut gallery voices...

got a question… or just wanna say hi…?

Talk to me…

If you'd like to support the show (and eventually help speed up the production process) you can buy me a coffee or a beer @ ko-fi.com Thanks! 


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In E. 25 we hit a fairytale fashion show, get a new urge to go chasing rabbits, and then we say hello to the numen

Part 1 [02:11] - In which we watch Hansel trying to make enough coin to keep everyone’s shit together

Part 2 [16:24] - In which we hit a fashion show of fairytale couture and end up giving three cheers for the designer

Part 3 [22:24] - In which we discover one helluva a new urge, but then resist the urge to go, uh, chasing rabbits

Part 4 [32:35] - In which we say hello to the numen

*transcripts and links for episode 25 are available at: betweenthelines.xyz

*Chapter Titles read by Anna Jacobsen*

*German Fairytale text read by Jürgen Lexow *

*Librivox Fairytale reading (auf Deutsch) by Stephan Gambke*

*Librivox Fairytale reading (English) by Bob Neufeld*

*Music and Sound credits for this episode are SUPER-extensive and can be found on the website @ betweenthelines.xyz

with special thanks to freesound.org for nearly all of kristo's awesome peanut gallery voices...

got a question… or just wanna say hi…?

Talk to me…

If you'd like to support the show (and eventually help speed up the production process) you can buy me a coffee or a beer @ ko-fi.com Thanks! 


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In episode 24 we take a whole lotta measurements, mix apples and oranges and oreos, and eventually have to flip a coin

Part 1 [01:58] - In which we flip a coin and come up with a new definition for AI

Part 2 [25:49] - In which we dabble a bit in astrology and alchemy, and end up tossing our moon rocks into a pond

Part 3 [32:41] - In which we say a few prayers, make a few comparisons, and see how music from the 60s measures up to music from the 80s

*transcripts and links for episode 24 are available at: betweenthelines.xyz

*Chapter Titles read by Anna Jacobsen*

*Fairytale reading by Bob Neufeld*

*Music and Sound credits for this episode are SUPER-extensive and can be found on the website @ betweenthelines.xyz

with special thanks to freesound.org for nearly all of kristo's awesome peanut gallery voices...

got a question… or just wanna say hi…?

Talk to me…

If you'd like to support the show (and eventually help speed up the production process) you can buy me a coffee or a beer @ ko-fi.com Thanks! 


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In episode 23 we bring back some moon rocks and get a lesson in Alchemy 101 

Part 1 [05:01] - In which we turn on the projector and watch some home movies of a moon landing, and then we find out that our intuition is on a mission: to Chicago

Part 2 [23:13] - In which we get a lesson in Alchemy 101, and…um…phew…!

*transcripts and links for each episode are available at: betweenthelines.xyz

*Chapter Titles read by Anna Jacobsen*

*German Fairytale text read by Jürgen Lexow *

*Music and Sound credits for this episode are SUPER-extensive and can be found on the website @ betweenthelines.xyz

with special thanks to freesound.org for nearly all of kristo's awesome peanut gallery voices...

got a question… or just wanna say hi…?

Talk to me…

If you'd like to support the show (and eventually help speed up the production process) you can buy me a coffee or a beer @ ko-fi.com Thanks! — okay, so a beer might slow down the process, but I gotta take a break SOMEtime...! 


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In E.022 we have a Medieval Mr. Rogers Moment as Hansel gets himself ready to make some real magic

Part 1 [06:59] - In which we watch the little brother escape all conscious control; we send Penn and Teller up the tree, and then we get ready for some real magic when the Grimms hand us a Grimoire

Part 2 [20:08] - In which the Grimms give us a Medieval Mr. Rogers moment, and then invite us to a limbo party of biblical proportion

*transcripts and links for all episodes of The Hansel and Gretel Code are available at: betweenthelines.xyz

*Chapter Titles read by Anna Jacobsen*

*German Fairytale text read by Jürgen Lexow *

*Music and Sound credits for this episode are SUPER-extensive and can be found on the website @ betweenthelines.xyz

*special thanks to freesound.org for nearly all of kristo's awesome peanut gallery voices...

got a question...?

Talk to me…

*transcripts and links for episode 22 are available at: betweenthelines.xyz

*Chapter Titles read by Anna Jacobsen*

*German Fairytale text read by Jürgen Lexow *

*Music and Sound credits for this episode are SUPER-extensive and can be found on the website @ betweenthelines.xyz

with special thanks to freesound.org for nearly all of kristo's awesome peanut gallery voices...

got a question… or just wanna say hi…?

Talk to me…

If you'd like to support the show (and eventually help speed up the production process) you can buy me a coffee or a beer @ ko-fi.com Thanks!


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In E. 021 we find out that the left hand knows exactly what the right hand is up to

Part 1 [07:20]: In which we hear about the Yin and Yang of Hansel and Gretel, and spend a few sleepless nights trying to figure out what GRACE has to do with insomnia 

Part 2 [20:23]: In which we find out that the Grimms put out a contract on the first Frau Holzhacker

 Part 3 [32:32]: In which we turn on the waterworks and raise a few feminist hackles 

Part 4 [39:54]: In which we partner up and make a very bold prediction

*transcripts and links for episode 21 are available at: betweenthelines.xyz

*Chapter Titles read by Anna Jacobsen*

*German Fairytale text read by Jürgen Lexow *

*Music and Sound credits for this episode are SUPER-extensive and can be found on the website @ betweenthelines.xyz

with special thanks to freesound.org for nearly all of kristo's awesome peanut gallery voices...

got a question… or just wanna say hi…?

Talk to me…

If you'd like to support the show (and eventually help speed up the production process) you can buy me a coffee or a beer @ ko-fi.com Thanks!


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In episode 20 we break out the philologic toolbox and end up with a casket of real fairytale gold

Part 1 [04:54] - In which we find Socrates moonlighting as a Taxi Driver

Part 2 [14:30] - In which we go metal detecting in a library and find that our breadcrumb trail is leading us on a detour to Italy

Part 3 [29:29] - In which we take a little cruise on a very famous ship, tune into a medieval comedy central, and find a couple of grown men calling each other names

Part 4 [40:42] - In which we go on a wild goose chase across Germany and end up in JUST the right corner of JUST the right library, where we find just the right sentence on just the right page in just the right book on just the right shelf... and holy kamoly... we find honest-to-god REAL FAIRYTALE GOLD

*transcripts and links for episode 20 are available at: betweenthelines.xyz

*Chapter Titles read by Anna Jacobsen*

*Music and Sound credits for this episode are SUPER-extensive and can be found on the website @ betweenthelines.xyz

with special thanks to freesound.org for nearly all of kristo's awesome peanut gallery voices...

got a question… or just wanna say hi…?

Talk to me…

If you'd like to support the show (and eventually help speed up the production process) you can buy me a coffee or a beer @ ko-fi.com Thanks!


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In episode 19 we attend one of those dinner theater thingy-s where we catch a show, and get served a heaping portion of steak tartare with a side of blood sausage

Part 1 [05:23] - In which we find out that there are a helluva lot of cannibals among us — and not ALL of them are zombies

Part 2 [15:37] - In which we board the Time Machine and get ourselves invited to the world’s first toga party

Part 3 [39:03] - In which we discover a family that’s even more dysfunctional than the Holzhackers, find a terrific alternative to facebook and the metaverse, and then hear about a bonus episode we can’t refuse

*transcripts and links for episode 19 are available at: betweenthelines.xyz

*Chapter Titles read by Anna Jacobsen*

*Music and Sound credits for this episode are SUPER-extensive and can be found on the website @ betweenthelines.xyz

with special thanks to freesound.org for nearly all of kristo's awesome peanut gallery voices...

got a question… or just wanna say hi…?

Talk to me…

If you'd like to support the show (and eventually help speed up the production process) you can buy me a coffee or a beer @ ko-fi.com Thanks!


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In episode 18 we take a close look at the bearded lady, visit one of Al Capone’s favorite hangouts, and find the historic typo responsible for everyone’s bad conscience

Part 1 [06:17] - In which we join a mob, walk through some celebrity’s split-level house, and then finally get to see the bearded lady, up close and personal

Part 2 [23:33] - In which we inspect the Vatican’s nuclear arsenal, throw around some Mardi Gras beads, and run into the big Catch-22 of Western Culturel

Part 3 [38:35] - In which we hold our first dead poet, podcast poetry slam, and then listen in as a couple of guys in the outfit get an assignment from the big boss

Part 4 [1:09:08] - In which we take a little trip on the time machine to read somebody else’s mail, and end up learning how a typo made an awful lotta people confuse Frau Holzhacker with St. Teresa

*transcripts and links for episode 18 are available at: betweenthelines.xyz

*Chapter Titles read by Anna Jacobsen*

*Music and Sound credits for this episode are SUPER-extensive and can be found on the website @ betweenthelines.xyz

with special thanks to freesound.org for nearly all of kristo's awesome peanut gallery voices...

got a question… or just wanna say hi…?

Talk to me…

If you'd like to support the show (and eventually help speed up the production process) you can buy me a coffee or a beer @ ko-fi.com Thanks!


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In episode 17 we hit the jackpot by dumpster diving, get ourselves one helluva fancy box, and then attend not one, but 3 barbecues, one of which is guaranteed to give us all goose bumps

Part 1 [08:24] - In which we find that the gingerbread in our story is not only missing a key ingredient: Selbstwertgefühl, it had a weird, bitter substitute baked into it: Selbstverliebtheit

Part 2 [17:12] - In which somebody roasts the most famous goose in history and the story goes viral

Part 3 [36:31] - In which we get invited to a bris - with a barbecue celebration to follow — but we have to drive through a busy construction zone in order to get there

*transcripts and links for episode 17 are available at: betweenthelines.xyz

*Chapter Titles read by Anna Jacobsen*

*Music and Sound credits for this episode are SUPER-extensive and can be found on the website @ betweenthelines.xyz

with special thanks to freesound.org for nearly all of kristo's awesome peanut gallery voices...

got a question… or just wanna say hi…?

Talk to me…

1